May 10 2013

A Walk in the Park: The Legacy of the 1903 Olmsted Plan

May 10th, 2013Posted by 

In 1903, landscape architect John Charles Olmsted wrote that “Seattle possesses extraordinary landscape advantages in having a great abundance and variety of water views and views of wooded hills and distant mountains and snow-capped peaks. I do not know of any place where the natural advantages for parks are better than here. They can be made very attractive and will […]

Share
Read full article 3 Comments     |    
May 03 2013

Green Schoolyards and Their Effect on Education: Thessaloniki, Greece

May 3rd, 2013Posted by 

It is really disappointing that every time we think of schools, a rigid, concrete structure comes to mind. Even in kindergarten, some of us remember playing inside the building, rather than enjoying a large green playground. Hopefully, this won’t have to be the case for our children. A few months ago, the municipality of Thessaloniki, Greece, […]

Share
Read full article 2 Comments     |    
May 01 2013

Global Site Plans Launches Advertising Opportunities

May 1st, 2013Posted by 

Global Site Plans (GSP) and The Grid would like to extend an opportunity to your business or organization to advertise on our website. As GSP and The Grid have grown immensely since their founding, less than three years ago, we are actively seeking companies congruent with our own philosophy who will benefit from advertising to […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
April 24 2013

The Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina: Preserved or At Risk?

April 24th, 2013Posted by 

Why is the Village of Pinehurst Important? Pinehurst was and is: A convalescent resort built for New Englanders in Moore County by American Soda Fountain Company magnate James W. Tufts; A New-England-style village and recreational resort, planned and landscaped by landscape architecture pioneers Fredrick Law Olmsted and Warren H. Manning, that would court those in […]

Share
Read full article 4 Comments     |    
April 19 2013

St. Sophia’s Street in Thessaloniki, Greece: A Pedestrian Zone?

April 19th, 2013Posted by 

Thessaloniki, Greece is a city with numerous beautiful spots, great architecture, and a long history. However, many current problems in the city have occurred due to modern style of life. For example, there is a significant lack of green spaces. The ideal average share of green space is estimated at 20 m²∕capita to 10 m²∕capita […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
April 14 2013

Seeking Spring 2013 Internship Applications: Environmental Design Blogger

April 14th, 2013Posted by 

Do you have a unique specialty in the field of environmental design? Do you currently live in a town or city that has not/or is currently not being covered by another blogger? Have you successfully managed social media platforms? Do you have a passion for writing and want to learn how to successfully blog? If […]

Share
Read full article 1 Comment     |    
April 12 2013

Cincinnati Public Staircases: A Walking History Abandoned But Not Forgotten

April 12th, 2013Posted by 

In recent decades, public staircases have been subject to a great deal of controversy in most cities, often viewed as places which are commonly associated with dangerous illegal activities such as crime, drug use, and even violence. In Cincinnati, Ohio – these staircases can be found in various urban locations throughout the city – some […]

Share
Read full article 14 Comments     |    
April 11 2013

From Flooding To Flourishing: The Revitalization Of An Otherwise Floodplain

April 11th, 2013Posted by 

The city of Lincoln, Nebraska has become a hub of new and innovative designs within the last couple of years. This innovation in development has truly proved Lincoln to be a growing city that encompasses environmental and functional design that benefits both the citizens of Lincoln and the environment alike. The Antelope Creek Valley is […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
April 10 2013

A Makeover for a Lively, But Car-Dependent Shopping Center

April 10th, 2013Posted by 

Fayetteville, North Carolina. Fayetteville’s forward-looking, 2030 draft “Growth Vision” imagines the city’s evolution: the sprawling, car-dependent home to Fort Bragg and Pope Air Force Base – characterized by its bedroom communities, “big box” stores, and chain restaurants – will grow into a city of walkable, mixed-use neighborhoods. Is this feasible? Perhaps. The Expansive Cross Creek […]

Share
Read full article 1 Comment     |    
April 08 2013

A Short River Story from Athens, Greece

April 8th, 2013Posted by 

Kifisos is a principal watercourse of the Attica basin which springs from mountains of Parnitha and Penteli, run through downtown Athens and eventually discharges into Saronikos Bay. Just before emptying into the sea, for a stretch of 20klm, river Kifisos has been regrettably covered by transportation infrastructure as means to avoid expensive expropriations. At its […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
April 04 2013

Courtney McLaughlin: A Farewell to Global Site Plans and The Grid

April 4th, 2013Posted by 

They say that when something is meant to be, you begin to see signs of it everywhere; life begins to push you in the direction you are supposed to go. I can certainly attest to this phenomenon in my experience with urban design. Once I discovered how strong my interest was in this field, I […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 29 2013

Cincinnati’s Central Riverfront Urban Design Master Plan Poised to Reach Project Vision

March 29th, 2013Posted by 

In the course of the last decade, American river cities have sustained continued interest from policy makers and urban planners who have worked to create targeted opportunities for significant long-term investment and economic development. In Cincinnati, this reinvestment has received national attention in terms of how the city has been able to connect environmental design […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 27 2013

Oahu, Hawaii’s Green Buffers: For Private Interest or the Public Good?

March 27th, 2013Posted by 

High-income residential and resort communities line Oahu’s most beautiful beaches: Along the North Shore; Near Kailua and Lanikai Beaches (where President Obama and his family vacationed this winter); Near Waialae Beah Park. Property owners in these and other areas have used greenery, including fast-growing vines and shrubbery, to obscure public easements. This trick of landscape […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 25 2013

Bioclimatic Upgrading of Open Public Spaces in Athens, Greece

March 25th, 2013Posted by 

Against all odds, municipalities, all over Greece, are in a race to propose projects for bioclimatic upgrading of public open spaces such as streets, squares, and parks. The “Bioclimatic upgrading for open public spaces” program is funded by the NSRF development program and guided by the Centre for Renewable Energy and Save (CRES). Its main […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 22 2013

Lack of Green Spaces? Pocket Parks are the Solution

March 22nd, 2013Posted by 

When one thinks of a park, one usually imagines a large plot full of trees in the centre of the city with routes for walking or jogging, and shaded sitting areas where people can enjoy the fresh breeze during the hot summer days. But what happens in cities, like Thessaloniki, Greece, in which green spaces […]

Share
Read full article 4 Comments     |    
March 19 2013

Micro Hydropower: An Underused Source of Renewable Energy?

March 19th, 2013Posted by 

Climate change is seen as the major problem of our generation, and confronting it will mean action on how energy is sourced and the levels of demand. In 1990, the United Kingdom signed an agreement for reducing emission levels at least 80% by 2050. The Northern Ireland government has set a bold target in relation […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 15 2013

Seattle’s New Front Porch: The Redevelopment of the Waterfront

March 15th, 2013Posted by 

Historically, port cities located their industrial zones near the waterfront for the convenience of transporting goods. Often times, highways or railroads were later constructed near the industrial waterfront. But as contemporary manufacturing and shipping processes are significantly more efficient and require less space (since transportation moved from bulk to shipping containers), these port cities are […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 13 2013

Waterfront Development in Shanghai: The Bund

March 13th, 2013Posted by 

For many urbanites, putting up with occasional construction is accepted as an unfortunate aspect of city living. In a rapidly developing city like Shanghai, however, it never stops. The construction of an ambitious redevelopment plan in the central area called “The Bund” will continue until 2020. First established as a British settlement area, The Bund […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
March 01 2013

Urban Art & the New York City Department of Transportation

March 1st, 2013Posted by 

New York City, above others, has defined itself through an evolving scholarship connected to its rapidly changing street life. This broad conception of street life has been widely debated and discussed from the standpoint of urban theorists and activists such as Jane Jacobs and William H. Whyte, whose respective works, The Death and Life of […]

Share
Read full article No Comments     |    
February 27 2013

Naval Air Station Barbers Point: How Did it Become a Ghost Town?

February 27th, 2013Posted by 

In 1993, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC) announced the closure of Naval Air Station Barbers Point, located on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. Formally closed in 1999, Barbers Point became the Kalaeloa Community Development District. In 2002, the State Legislature appointed the Hawaiian Community Development Authority (HCDA), an agency that works to revitalize areas […]

Share
Read full article 3 Comments     |    
 

Follow US

Categories