December 23 2013

Toronto’s Victorian Distillery Becomes a Popular Pedestrian-Only Cultural Hub

December 23rd, 2013Posted by 

Ten years ago, if you mentioned “Gooderam and Worts,” you likely got a blank stare. Today, mention the area under its new name, the Distillery District, and Torontonians will list many things they love about it: brick pedestrian-only streets, historic buildings, arts and theatre, boutique shops (no chains allowed), restaurants, the Mill Street Brewery, and […]

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December 18 2013

The Role of Beauty in Infrastructure: Kazakhstan’s Almaty Metro Inspires

December 18th, 2013Posted by 

I recently rode the Almaty Metro, in Kazakhstan, at present a single-line subway that opened in 2011 after being under construction since the late days of the Soviet Union. Exiting at Almaly station, I was captivated by a stained-glass mural, which led me to contemplate the role of beauty in infrastructure–specifically in American subway station […]

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December 17 2013

Nothern Ireland Considering Demolition of Historically Significant & Listed Buildings

December 17th, 2013Posted by 

Belfast has a vast array of historically important buildings that reflect how the city has evolved. Even though these buildings have been labeled as protected, they are still at risk of demolition. The PAC (Public Accounts Committee) has said that the “body responsible for safeguarding the buildings is not doing enough to protect the most vulnerable.” The […]

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December 10 2013

Noord-Zuidlijn in Amsterdam: Digging a Metro Line under the Historic City

December 10th, 2013Posted by 

For the last ten years, visitors of Amsterdam have been surprised at the sight of several open construction sites in the city’s historic center. Starting at Central Station, open construction sites are found throughout the city until the South/WTC railway station. The reality is that those multiple sites are all part of one big project: […]

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December 03 2013

It’s History, But Not Preserved: The Demolition of The University of Ulster, Belfast

December 3rd, 2013Posted by 

What should happen to worn out buildings? Should they be refurbished or demolished to make way for a new design? Questions like these often come up in situations of regeneration, such as in Belfast with the redevelopment of University of Ulster. The University of Ulster is currently situated in Belfast, but there are also campuses in […]

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November 27 2013

Pittsburgh Leading the Way in Historic Preservation

November 27th, 2013Posted by 

Since the 1960′s, the city of Pittsburgh has been one of the largest centers for historic preservation in any city in America. The Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation was created in 1964 and has awarded over 500 historic plaques, designated twelve historic districts, and named 90 historic structures for preservation across the city limits. These […]

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November 21 2013

Pike Place Market Was Almost A Hockey Arena

November 21st, 2013Posted by 

Pike Place Market is one of Seattle’s most iconic landmarks, and is most favorable for tourist activity. While today no one doubts its importance and historic value, in the past planners had proposed to replace the market and revitalize the area with new development; even a hockey arena. Nowadays, it is difficult to think why such […]

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November 13 2013

Pittsburgh’s Venues Help Bring in Tourism

November 13th, 2013Posted by 

The city of Pittsburgh is known for having some of the best stadiums and arenas across the United States. With over a dozen total venues, Pittsburgh brings in thousands of people a year for concerts and sports events across the city. The largest two stadiums in the city, Heinz Field and PNC Park, sit within […]

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October 31 2013

Oakland, California: Revitalization and Retail Expansion on Broadway

October 31st, 2013Posted by 

As recognized by the city itself, “Oakland has long been the nation’s largest underserved Trade Area for comparison goods… export(ing) 75% of its potential sales… or roughly $1 billion in sales every year, to the neighboring communities of Emeryville, San Leandro, San Francisco, and Walnut Creek.” The city hopes to begin resolving this issue with the […]

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September 17 2013

Should Casablanca’s Colonial Heritage Be Preserved?

September 17th, 2013Posted by 

Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city; but unlike the rest of the country’s major cities that were founded between the seventh and fifteenth centuries, Casablanca’s history is quite recent. Casablanca was one of five new planned cities in Morocco after the establishment of the French protectorate in 1912. This political decision aimed at the creation of […]

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September 17 2013

Abandoned Minor League Stadium Revamped to Serve as Apartments

September 17th, 2013Posted by 

Bush Stadium resides in the northwest corner of downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. The stadium was home to Minor League and Negro League baseball teams from 1931 to 1996, when the Indianapolis Indians’ new stadium opened in the southwest corner of downtown. Since then, it has seen numerous uses: a mini racetrack for midget racecars, a junkyard […]

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September 12 2013

The Many Bridges of Minneapolis, Minnesota & Their Inherent Significance

September 12th, 2013Posted by 

A well-known fact is one of Minneapolis, Minnesota’s birthplaces of origin, situated at the Saint Anthony Falls on the mighty Mississippi River. This historical place is also the site of the Stone Arch Bridge, built in 1883 by James J. Hill for the Great Northern Railway. This former railroad bridge, located in downtown Minneapolis, has […]

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September 02 2013

“Where ya Stay at?” How the Accretion of Cultures Becomes Nola’s City Planners

September 2nd, 2013Posted by 

“Where ya stay at” is a common question for natives of New Orleans, Louisiana. Although phrased differently, this is sometimes a typical question in other American cities; however, New Orleans is not a typical American city. Its neighborhoods vary in architecture, physical layout, and general atmosphere due to the many residing cultures. Over the course of several […]

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August 22 2013

Unique Form-Based Code Sets Petaluma Above the Rest

August 22nd, 2013Posted by 

Take a stroll through downtown Petaluma, and you will see why it is different from every other city in Sonoma County. It does not sprawl out like a spider web of big-box retailers and suburban developments like Rohnert Park, nor does its downtown emanate from a central plaza like Healdsburg and Sonoma. Instead, Petaluma’s urban core remains […]

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June 11 2013

Asia’s Sprawling, High Density Future: Exporting New Urbanism to Developing Countries at The Congress for the New Urbanism’s CNU21

June 11th, 2013Posted by 

Dan Solomon, Mithun | Solomon Dan Solomon, CNU co-founder, author, and Principal at Mithun | Solomon, opened the session by saying that in the context of new urbanism concepts being introduced to developing countries, “We can’t exactly declare victory, but we’ve made our presence strong.” Overall, he explained the urban planning struggles in China. He […]

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May 24 2013

The Surviving Personality of Pike Place Market

May 24th, 2013Posted by 

In a time where you can buy almost anything online, Seattle’s Pike Place Market reminds us that character and convenience are not synonymous. It is a place that connects Seattleites (and tourists) to the city’s history. Beginning in 1907, the city’s first public farmer’s market was once nothing more than a few local farmers selling […]

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April 30 2013

Best in Heritage Conservation: Awards by the Argentinean Architects Association

April 30th, 2013Posted by 

Built Environment professionals, myself included, tend to focus on the latest trends concerning sustainability, smart growth, and recent technologies for construction. Many times we end up relegating historical preservation and everything concerning Built Heritage Conservation as a métier only for experienced professionals, who embark on these projects as a way of closing their careers, as […]

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April 24 2013

The Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina: Preserved or At Risk?

April 24th, 2013Posted by 

Why is the Village of Pinehurst Important? Pinehurst was and is: A convalescent resort built for New Englanders in Moore County by American Soda Fountain Company magnate James W. Tufts; A New-England-style village and recreational resort, planned and landscaped by landscape architecture pioneers Fredrick Law Olmsted and Warren H. Manning, that would court those in […]

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March 14 2013

Preservation or Progress? The Battle for Prentice Hospital

March 14th, 2013Posted by 

As architect Bertrand Goldberg’s civic legacy was highlighted in his engagement with Federal regulators during the Marina City Project, another prominent building of his remains mired in a preservation struggle. The Prentice Women’s Hospital (pictured above) is considered an icon of modern design, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation just lost the fight to save it from […]

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March 11 2013

The Broadway: Reclaiming and Re-Imagining Historic Warehouses through Creative Development in Minneapolis, Minnesota

March 11th, 2013Posted by 

Known as a predominantly industrial and blue-collar neighborhood, the Northeast Minneapolis District in Minneapolis, Minnesota has been experiencing a significant economic and physical transformation in the last few decades, and has become closely affiliated with sustainable living and its growing artist population. Historic warehouses and old factories have taken on a new purpose of artist […]

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