March 13 2014

Tearing it Down: Melbourne at Odds with British Architectural History

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

Melbourne has an iconic history, which is only 200 somewhat years old. Having a British lineage means that most of the buildings created in the gold rush days resemble European ideals that today may seem a little dated for the modern Australian. That being said, the city of Melbourne takes heritage preservation very seriously and […]

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March 13 2014

What the Seahawk’s Super Bowl Victory Did for Historic Preservation in Seattle

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

It is not our reputation here in Seattle to get too wild. But after the Seahawks dominated in our first Super Bowl this year, we had to take the streets. While I watched from below, dozens climbed and rallied on top of the century-old Pergola (pictured below), breaking panes of its fragile glass. But fans […]

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March 12 2014

Industrial Mills of Jones Falls Redeveloped for a New Baltimore

March 12th, 2014Posted by 

My previous blog discussed the chronic undercrowding in the City of Baltimore and the current plans to reverse it by charming homebuyers with reduced property tax rates. The City has also been charming developers of the once abandoned stone mills clustered around Jones Falls. The lure is still tax related, but this time in the […]

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March 11 2014

The Uncertain Future of a Landmark Victorian Building in Belfast, Ireland

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

It’s historical preservation week at The Grid and in Belfast, a landmark Victorian building is facing an uncertain future. In the city centre, the former Swanston’s Linen Warehouse has recently been denied demolition after the third bid to tear the warehouse down. The future of the building had been the subject of a legal row […]

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March 11 2014

The Rebirth of Ziller’s Omonoia Square: Athens, Greece

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

Two old hotels, Bagion and Megas Alexandros, and the café Neon stand observing, like always, the prewar neoclassical square Omonoia. These are the only buildings that keep the memory of the old square alive and moreover seem to have many things in common. All three of them were built in the same period, at the end of […]

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March 11 2014

Is the Work of Colombian Architect Rogelio Salmona Destined to Ruins?

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

Rogelio Salmona is recognized as one of the most important architects of Latin America. For over fifty years, his works and thoughts guided the formation of hundreds of architects who find in them an expression that is both in tune with contemporary trends and traditional sensibilities, with the cultural characteristics of the place in which […]

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February 05 2014

Horrible Historic Preservation in 3 Easy Steps

February 5th, 2014Posted by 

Historic preservation has come a long way from the protesters in front of the old Penn Station in New York, and today it also focuses on issues such as placemaking and the revitalization of neglected buildings and neighborhoods. However, when it is done badly, historic preservation can hinder development and even unintentionally destroy what it […]

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January 16 2014

A Historical Chinese Industrial Building’s Fate Left to Government Hands

January 16th, 2014Posted by 

As the rate of industrialization and urbanization accelerates in China, more and more factories are becoming deserted. Preserving and developing industrial cultural heritage has become an issue that gathers the public’s attention.  The Zhongyan Hongsifang Joint-Stock Company complex was built in the 1950s in Anhui Province, China. The industrial site had a glorious past, but […]

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January 14 2014

Xiamen Encourages Public Participation in the Planning Process

January 14th, 2014Posted by 

On December 26th 2013, Xiamen Planning Department director Zhao Yanjing held a press conference to discuss the public participation initiatives that the planning department would carry out in the city’s future planning projects. Reporter: The recent Yuandang Lake Pedestrian Path project and the park bench donation program have attracted significant attention from the citizens. Will […]

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December 26 2013

Civic Participation in Jinan, China’s Historic Preservation

December 26th, 2013Posted by 

A couple weeks ago, a series of photos were posted online that showed some historic buildings in the city of Jinan were under threat of demolition as a result of a construction site. The photos attracted a lot of comments on the Internet, and many people accused the developers of damaging the century-old buildings. The […]

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December 23 2013

Toronto’s Victorian Distillery Becomes a Popular Pedestrian-Only Cultural Hub

December 23rd, 2013Posted by 

Ten years ago, if you mentioned “Gooderam and Worts,” you likely got a blank stare. Today, mention the area under its new name, the Distillery District, and Torontonians will list many things they love about it: brick pedestrian-only streets, historic buildings, arts and theatre, boutique shops (no chains allowed), restaurants, the Mill Street Brewery, and […]

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December 18 2013

The Role of Beauty in Infrastructure: Kazakhstan’s Almaty Metro Inspires

December 18th, 2013Posted by 

I recently rode the Almaty Metro, in Kazakhstan, at present a single-line subway that opened in 2011 after being under construction since the late days of the Soviet Union. Exiting at Almaly station, I was captivated by a stained-glass mural, which led me to contemplate the role of beauty in infrastructure–specifically in American subway station […]

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December 17 2013

Nothern Ireland Considering Demolition of Historically Significant & Listed Buildings

December 17th, 2013Posted by 

Belfast has a vast array of historically important buildings that reflect how the city has evolved. Even though these buildings have been labeled as protected, they are still at risk of demolition. The PAC (Public Accounts Committee) has said that the “body responsible for safeguarding the buildings is not doing enough to protect the most vulnerable.” The […]

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December 10 2013

Noord-Zuidlijn in Amsterdam: Digging a Metro Line under the Historic City

December 10th, 2013Posted by 

For the last ten years, visitors of Amsterdam have been surprised at the sight of several open construction sites in the city’s historic center. Starting at Central Station, open construction sites are found throughout the city until the South/WTC railway station. The reality is that those multiple sites are all part of one big project: […]

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December 03 2013

It’s History, But Not Preserved: The Demolition of The University of Ulster, Belfast

December 3rd, 2013Posted by 

What should happen to worn out buildings? Should they be refurbished or demolished to make way for a new design? Questions like these often come up in situations of regeneration, such as in Belfast with the redevelopment of University of Ulster. The University of Ulster is currently situated in Belfast, but there are also campuses in […]

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November 27 2013

Pittsburgh Leading the Way in Historic Preservation

November 27th, 2013Posted by 

Since the 1960′s, the city of Pittsburgh has been one of the largest centers for historic preservation in any city in America. The Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation was created in 1964 and has awarded over 500 historic plaques, designated twelve historic districts, and named 90 historic structures for preservation across the city limits. These […]

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November 21 2013

Pike Place Market Was Almost A Hockey Arena

November 21st, 2013Posted by 

Pike Place Market is one of Seattle’s most iconic landmarks, and is most favorable for tourist activity. While today no one doubts its importance and historic value, in the past planners had proposed to replace the market and revitalize the area with new development; even a hockey arena. Nowadays, it is difficult to think why such […]

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November 13 2013

Pittsburgh’s Venues Help Bring in Tourism

November 13th, 2013Posted by 

The city of Pittsburgh is known for having some of the best stadiums and arenas across the United States. With over a dozen total venues, Pittsburgh brings in thousands of people a year for concerts and sports events across the city. The largest two stadiums in the city, Heinz Field and PNC Park, sit within […]

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October 31 2013

Oakland, California: Revitalization and Retail Expansion on Broadway

October 31st, 2013Posted by 

As recognized by the city itself, “Oakland has long been the nation’s largest underserved Trade Area for comparison goods… export(ing) 75% of its potential sales… or roughly $1 billion in sales every year, to the neighboring communities of Emeryville, San Leandro, San Francisco, and Walnut Creek.” The city hopes to begin resolving this issue with the […]

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September 17 2013

Should Casablanca’s Colonial Heritage Be Preserved?

September 17th, 2013Posted by 

Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city; but unlike the rest of the country’s major cities that were founded between the seventh and fifteenth centuries, Casablanca’s history is quite recent. Casablanca was one of five new planned cities in Morocco after the establishment of the French protectorate in 1912. This political decision aimed at the creation of […]

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