March 20 2015

Acclaimed Minnesota State Capitol Undergoing $272M Restoration

March 20th, 2015Posted by 

State Capitol Buildings are incredibly important pieces of architecture in the United States of America. Not only do they house a State’s House of Representatives, Senate, and Supreme Court, they also stand as icons to the State in which they reside. The history of each building’s origin and development over their lifetime can be quite fascinating. Here […]

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March 16 2015

San Francisco Adaptive Reuse: From Church to Tech Office

March 16th, 2015Posted by 

When it comes to finding available, unique spaces in San Francisco, tech companies like Twitter, AirBnB, and countless others take on a hermit crab approach. Limited space, dense urban conditions, and nightmarish building regulations make it nearly impossible to build from the ground up. In response, tech companies have resorted to adaptive reuse. Repurposing neglected […]

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March 11 2015

Visionless Phnom Penh, Cambodia: How Will Rapid Development Shape its Future?

March 11th, 2015Posted by 

Phnom Penh, Cambodia has had a tumultuous history that spans architectural ingenuity to human tragedy. It is currently undergoing a rapid phase of urbanization and modernization. As this sleepy city steadily grows, many new structures are changing the face of Cambodia’s capital. There are mounting concerns about how such change could affect the city’s culture, […]

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February 02 2015

Book Review of “Spectacular Vernacular: London’s 100 Most Extraordinary Buildings”

February 2nd, 2015Posted by 

In “Spectacular Vernacular: London’s 100 Most Extraordinary Buildings,” David Long takes the reader through central London to discover its least known yet extraordinary buildings. As disclosed in the book’s introduction, the author aims at attracting both London visitors and longtime residents’ attention to some of the least celebrated buildings and structures of the English Capital. […]

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January 20 2015

Are Eco-Towers Coming to Downtown Paris, France?

January 20th, 2015Posted by 

An engineering and architecture firm have been working on Paris’ Climate/Energy Plan, to be achieved by 2050. Their work led to plans for large, positive energy apartment buildings. How can we invent the city of the future while considering the constraints, necessities, and aspirations of its inhabitants, administrations, and enterprises? This, especially given that we live in a […]

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January 07 2015

Zaha Hadid’s Architecture to Reconcile Khmer Rouge for Phnom Penh, Cambodia?

January 7th, 2015Posted by 

It has been almost 40 years since the terror of the Khmer Rouge began in Cambodia, but the scars are still visible and the country is still recovering. In recent years, Phnom Penh has seen unprecedented growth and innovation, especially in the design and construction industry. However, as foreign aid and foreign architecture infiltrates the […]

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January 06 2015

Holistic Architect, Lutgarde Brun, to Lead Huy, Belgium’s Urban Planning Services

January 6th, 2015Posted by 

Lutgarde Brun is the new city architect in Huy, Belgium. Numerous challenges, many of them quite large, await her, but she is prepared and excited to tackle them head on. With 2,000 new inhabitants expected in Huy over the course of the next ten years (and 1,000 new lodgings that will come with them), the […]

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December 30 2014

New Housing to Replace Former Hospital in Annecy, France

December 30th, 2014Posted by 

On November 28, 2014, renovation became legal on the site of the future Trésums neighborhood in Annecy, France. This decision came through from the State Council after a long judicial saga. On the site, asbestos removal is currently taking place, and the deconstruction of the former hospital will soon follow. All of this will leave room […]

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December 25 2014

Despite Renovation, Minneapolis’ Foshay Tower Holds onto its Historical Roots

December 25th, 2014Posted by 

Have you ever watched helplessly as a space that you loved was renovated, ultimately preventing you from re-experiencing memories which have taken place there before? Most of us have. Many people were concerned that one of the American Midwest’s most beloved buildings would experience this same fate when its extensive renovation was announced. In late […]

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December 15 2014

“Main Street Movement” Spurs the Revitalization of Small Towns in Iowa

December 15th, 2014Posted by 

Small towns in Iowa all seem to have one thing in common: historic Main Streets. The Main Streets of Iowa are typically composed of a few blocks of low-slung brick buildings. They are simplistic and unimposing, with small businesses on the ground level and housing or office space above. While the historic significance of these […]

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December 15 2014

The Architectural Paradox: SOM’s Oakland Cathedral of Christ the Light

December 15th, 2014Posted by 

Derived from the Greek word Katholicos, the word catholic means “universal” or “all-embracing.” This is an interesting paradox for a religion with an often authoritative past and history of exclusion. A paradox is a statement which contradicts itself but may be true. Unlike “drowning in a the fountain of eternal life” or “jumbo shrimp” the […]

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December 03 2014

Architectural Heritage Loses Ground in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

December 3rd, 2014Posted by 

Among the aged temples and deteriorating colonial buildings in Phnom Penh, rise a new architecture of an international contemporary style that could be located anywhere in the world. Everyday new developments erase part of the city’s past, and without a strong effort to preserve some of the meaningful structures, Phnom Penh’s current construction boom could […]

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December 01 2014

Dogpatch Destination: Pier 70 is San Francisco’s Center for Redevelopment

December 1st, 2014Posted by 

In the early 1900’s, the Dogpatch district was considered San Francisco’s industrial city-center with over 18,000 people working at Pier 70 daily. As one of the only neighborhoods to survive the destructive fires brought on by the earthquake of 1906, the Dogpatch stands as a living archive within the city. This district off the bay was once home […]

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November 27 2014

Preservationists Mobilize to Save Poet Vigneault’s Village in Natashquan, Quebec

November 27th, 2014Posted by 

If we were to take a poll among the people of Quebec, a small percentage would be able to locate Natashquan on a map. However, the name of this tiny village, located in the Côte-Nord, around 1,300 kilometers from Montreal, is known to millions of people across French-speaking nations. Google the word Natashquan, and you […]

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November 12 2014

Architecture of Corruption in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

November 12th, 2014Posted by 

How does corruption affect architecture? Considering how corrupt Cambodia is (ranks 160 of 177 countries in the world) and that Phnom Penh does not have an implemented zoning or investment plan for future urban development, the architecture in the city reflects these unplanned conditions. So what does corrupt architecture look like – does it have […]

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October 21 2014

São Paulo, Brazil Street Markets Celebrate 100 Years

October 21st, 2014Posted by 

On August 25th, 2014 we celebrated 100 years of the formal existence of street markets in São Paulo, a true cultural heritage of the city. The date refers to the first regulation of this activity in the capital, Act 710, signed by Mayor Washington Luis in 1914. The first official market in the city took place […]

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October 01 2014

Wise or Not, Canton Crossing Brings the Suburbs to Baltimore City, Maryland

October 1st, 2014Posted by 

If you had never been to Baltimore City and I blindfolded you and dropped you off at the shops at Canton Crossing, upon taking off the blindfold you would rightfully assume that you were in a suburb far, far away. An asphalt parking lot would span out in front of you, without any direct pedestrian path […]

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September 29 2014

A Visual Typology: A Modern Face-Lift To San Francisco’s Victorian Homes

September 29th, 2014Posted by 

Take a walk with me. We are walking up a San Francisco street so steep you think it might be easier to crawl. You feel that if you were to extend your arms straight out you could touch the very ground you tread. Feel your calves burning? Good, now look up. Look at the homes lining […]

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September 22 2014

“Autogeddon:” Is The Automobile Killing San Francisco’s Infrastructure?

September 22nd, 2014Posted by 

Pedestrian and cyclist safety has always been a pressing issue in the San Francisco Bay Area, with injuries and fatalities currently reaching record highs. In this post, I would like to steer clear of contributing to my previous tirades about the lack of pedestrian safety in San Francisco, leaving that to my previous article addressing the […]

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August 27 2014

San Francisco’s Mission District: The Controversial Gentrification

August 27th, 2014Posted by 

A walk through the heart of San Francisco’s historic Mission District is typically charged with the activity of crowded sidewalk fruit markets, lively music, and the smells from taquerías and pupusas. While this energy is still present, it is steadily being muted by the invasion of San Francisco’s love and woe: the “techie.” They have elevated […]

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