November 27 2013

Pittsburgh Leading the Way in Historic Preservation

November 27th, 2013Posted by 

Since the 1960′s, the city of Pittsburgh has been one of the largest centers for historic preservation in any city in America. The Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation was created in 1964 and has awarded over 500 historic plaques, designated twelve historic districts, and named 90 historic structures for preservation across the city limits. These […]

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November 27 2013

Is Parco Sud a Park or Agricultural Land?: A Southern Milan Debate

November 27th, 2013Posted by 

Parks have always been considered as green spaces for recreational use. Lately, urban planning policies have been expanding their definition by providing significant attention to different types of green spaces across the city – and their functionalities. “The Rural Park of South Milan,” also known as “Parco Sud,” is an example of how diverse a park can […]

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November 25 2013

Toulouse’s Exhibition Center to Begin Construction in 2015 in Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées, France

November 25th, 2013Posted by 

The public inquiry into Greater Toulouse’s future exhibition center began November 4th, and will come to a close on December 13th. The Urban Community of Greater Toulouse hopes to obtain a recognition of public interest in 2014 so that work may begin in 2015. An essential step in the plans for the exhibition center, set to open […]

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November 13 2013

Pittsburgh’s Venues Help Bring in Tourism

November 13th, 2013Posted by 

The city of Pittsburgh is known for having some of the best stadiums and arenas across the United States. With over a dozen total venues, Pittsburgh brings in thousands of people a year for concerts and sports events across the city. The largest two stadiums in the city, Heinz Field and PNC Park, sit within […]

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November 12 2013

IJburg, Amsterdam: Innovative Neighborhood on Artificial Islands

November 12th, 2013Posted by 

IJburg is one of the newest neighborhoods in Amsterdam. In this city of high density and scarce developable land, the creation of a new neighborhood is a long and expensive planning process. IJburg is a unique urban planning experiment that consisted of creating a neighborhood from scratch. The project came mainly to respond to a […]

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November 05 2013

Can Architecture Resolve Conflict?: The Legacy of Northern Ireland’s Peace Walls

November 5th, 2013Posted by 

A key element within architecture that can create a beautiful sense of enclosure or an intimidating space, are walls. In Northern Ireland the wall symbolises a history of conflict and separation, associated with the violent events of The Troubles. The conflict was territorial, not religious, between Irish Nationalist (mostly self-identified as Irish and/or Roman Catholic) […]

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October 30 2013

Pittsburgh’s Public Transit System Expands City’s Limits

October 30th, 2013Posted by 

As with most large metropolitan areas, public transit is a key component of the city of Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh transit system, known as Port Authority, is one of the largest in America. They run over 500 urban buses, ninety light rail buses, and unique to the Pittsburgh area, two inclines. With daily ridership being over […]

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October 16 2013

Draining the Earth: Natural Gas Drilling an Issue for Pittsburgh

October 16th, 2013Posted by 

Currently one of the largest environmental issues in the United States is the debate on drilling for Natural Gas. This debate has hit close to home as well, as the city of Pittsburgh and the surrounding area sits along one of the largest natural gas filled rock formations in the country, the Marcellus Shale. By […]

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October 15 2013

The Indianapolis Cultural Trail: One of the City’s Greatest Achievements

October 15th, 2013Posted by 

In the past year, the Indianapolis Cultural Trail has received attention and support from both native Hoosiers and people across the country. Cities such as Portland, Oregon and Cleveland, Ohio have voiced their support (and jealousy) of the eight-mile bike path that connects five of the six Indianapolis Cultural Districts. The trail has also been […]

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October 02 2013

Pittsburgh Remains Front-Runner of LEED Technology

October 2nd, 2013Posted by 

The city of Pittsburgh has been a front-runner of LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, since the program’s inception back in 1998. The LEED system helps to rank green buildings in the terms of their design and construction in order to make new buildings more energy efficient and sustainable. There are currently over […]

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September 25 2013

Expo 2017: “Energy for the Future” to be Held in Astana, Kazakhstan

September 25th, 2013Posted by 

Kazakhstan, a country with extensive oil and natural gas reserves, will hold an international exposition on sustainable energy in 2017. Expo 2017  - “Energy for the Future” is one of the international expositions regulated by the International Exhibitions Bureau. Astana, Kazakhstan’s capital, bested Liege, Belgium in the 2012 bid to hold Expo 2017. Each city […]

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September 18 2013

The Rebirth of Pittsburgh’s Strip District

September 18th, 2013Posted by 

While many of Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods have seen major renovations in the last fifty years, none have gone through such an extreme change as the Strip District. Getting its name from its location, being a small, half-square mile strip of land along the banks of the Allegheny River just north of the city’s downtown corridor, the […]

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August 21 2013

Alex Riemondy’s Farewell to Global Site Plans and The Grid

August 21st, 2013Posted by 

I couldn’t have thought of a better way to kick off my journey to becoming an urban planner than writing for The Grid. Over the past year I have explored an array of planning and environmental design topics through blogging. Each topic has expanded my thinking of both simple and complex ideas, such as what truly makes a community, or what are some of the greatest […]

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July 24 2013

The Almono Site: From Brownfield to Bright Future

July 24th, 2013Posted by 

On the outskirts of Pittsburgh’s city limits sits an old, abandoned steel mill. Rusting away and taking up space on a majestic hillside along the banks of the Monongahela River, the former J&L Steel site is 178 acres of prime real estate, just minutes from Pittsburgh’s downtown corridor. The site was abandoned by J&L Steel […]

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July 12 2013

Parting Words: Farewell From Michael Jenkins

July 12th, 2013Posted by 

It started with a single hashtag and tweet after a week long Sustainable Decisions and Organizations at the University of Nottingham Business School. It was then that I followed and was followed back by Global Site Plans. I found an incredible interest the articles posted by the urban design blog site. Not once did I imagine that I […]

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July 12 2013

Discovering Successful Neighborhood Elements in South Minneapolis

July 12th, 2013Posted by 

We all know when a neighborhood is livable. When a street works, it feels charming by instinct. But why? What specific urban planning techniques make a street successful? To discover these answers, I took a look at communities in South Minneapolis to uncover how neighborhoods have succeeded in captivating their citizens. Although there is a plethora […]

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July 11 2013

A Farewell to Global Site Plans and The Grid From Maxwell Vidaver

July 11th, 2013Posted by 

Six months went by awfully quickly. I started writing for The Grid during a wet and cold January in Milan, Italy; it is now July, hot, and sunny. The internship happened to coincide with my last semester of graduate school; classes are over, and the once-distant light of graduation is within reach.  The way these […]

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July 10 2013

Sustainable Campuses: Universities Acting Locally and Educating Globally

July 10th, 2013Posted by 

One of the main concerns of urban planners nowadays is designing for a more sustainable environment. As planners, we commit to provide innovative ideas for sustainable urban design – but what about the others? When it comes to these sustainability principles, universities play a strong role in educating the next generation. Can universities educate a lifestyle towards more sustainable behavior? […]

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July 04 2013

Chicago’s Polluted and Under-used Waterways

July 4th, 2013Posted by 

The South Branch of the Chicago River Chicago’s relationship with its river is a conflicted one. Chicago was only chosen as a settlement site due to the possibility of joining two major watersheds, that of the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River to the Mississippi River. The waterway that made the city possible took […]

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July 03 2013

(The GRID Blogger) Greg Shermeto: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

July 3rd, 2013Posted by 

A big Global Site Plans welcome to our newest blogger, Greg Shermeto in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Greg Shermeto is a recent graduate at the State University of New York at Buffalo with a B.A. in Environmental Design. While studying,Greg worked on projects including the South Buffalo Trolley and Trail System, which helped to connect the Western New […]

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