May 20 2014

Thessaloniki, Greece Brings Greeks Together for Bicycle Race & Advocacy

May 20th, 2014Posted by 

Thessaloniki, Greece, was one of the cities that participated in the 7th Nationwide Bicycle race, that took place May 11, 2014. Many people in several other cities sent their own message by joining this spectacular event. Thessaloniki, Athens, Volos, Amaliada, Argos, Drama, Heraklion, Zacharo, Thassos, Ierapetra, Ioannina, Karystos, Katerini, Kerkyra, Kozani, Lamia, Larisa, Missolonghi, Mytilene, Molos, […]

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May 15 2014

Spinalonga: The Greek Island of Lepers Finally Resurrected & Accepting Tourists

May 15th, 2014Posted by 

Sixteen buildings on the Greek island of Spinalonga are going to be braced and cleaned in order to be used in a new archaeological site. In addition to these changes, there will be another project that aims to improve the accessibility for tourists of the island, which was used as a leprosarium for more that half […]

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May 13 2014

The Archaeological Site of Philippi, Greece in UNESCO’s Monuments List?

May 13th, 2014Posted by 

According to an affirmation by the Ministry of Culture to the Municipality of Kavala, Greece, the archaeological site of Philippi is going to be the next nominee for UNESCO’s World Heritage List. The science working group of Kavala’s Municipality, in cooperation with Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, has prepared all the required documents. The equivalent preparations […]

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May 08 2014

Open House Worldwide Movement Finally Exhibited in Athens, Greece

May 8th, 2014Posted by 

Open House has been organized to take place in Athens. However, the issue is why it took so long. It doesn’t seem to be a coincidence. During the crisis, people finally realized the lack of urban awareness and turned to initiatives, like Open House. In the present case, the twice successful Open House in Thessaloniki […]

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April 10 2014

Video of Submerged Port City in Pavlopetri, Greece

April 10th, 2014Posted by 

Pavlopetri, one of the oldest cities in the world, is located south of Laconia, opposite to breathtaking Elafonisos. The submerged port city was already in its heyday by the Bronze Age. Pavlopetri had an excellent road design and a well constructed road network, while at the same time it had a port, houses with gardens, […]

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April 08 2014

Online Platform Aims to Fix Their “City of Errors”

April 8th, 2014Posted by 

A couple of years ago, a group of young people decided to voluntarily set up an interactive platform for their city. A platform that according to their official website is aimed at all people who find, deal with and repair the errors of the city where they live. In the beginning, the group created a […]

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March 25 2014

The Inauguration of Canada Park in Thessaloniki, Greece

March 25th, 2014Posted by 

The “Canada” Park was inaugurated on Agia Sofia Street, in the centre of Thessaloniki, a month ago. This park was created on the occasion of the seventieth anniversary of the initiation of the Diplomatic Relations between Canada and Greece. In the Canada Park, a sign has been placed to honour Mackenzie King, who was a […]

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March 18 2014

Exploring the City: The Old Slaughterhouse of Thessaloniki, Greece

March 18th, 2014Posted by 

On February 17, 1896 was the year the first Olympic Games took place in Athens. After several long meetings, Thessaloniki’s city council decided to launch certain public projects for the improvement of the city’s infrastructure. Among them, the council proposed the demolition of the old slaughterhouse and the construction of a new one. That same year, […]

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January 13 2014

The Country’s Largest Light Rail System

January 13th, 2014Posted by 

City life in many places is synonymous with using public transportation- especially rail systems. However, when it comes to measuring the stretch of light rail miles, Dallas, Texas takes the top spot. The city has the longest light rail system in the country, spanning eighty-five miles and utilizing sixty-one stations. While the expanse of the light […]

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January 09 2014

Environmental Protection Policies in China Need Stricter Implementation

January 9th, 2014Posted by 

In the first half of December 2013, a large-scale-smog occurred in eastern China, which affected twenty-five provinces and more than 100 cities. Data from a popular online shopping website shows that in 2013, customers have spent 870 million Yuan on buying masks, air purification machines, and indoor trackmills. The top five cities and provinces that […]

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December 31 2013

Shrinking the Gap Between China’s First-Tier Cities and Other Cities

December 31st, 2013Posted by 

On December 18, 2013, Yi Peng, Director of the International Financial Seminar Urbanization Research Center hosted an online webinar to answer questions about China’s urbanization policies. During the webinar, Yi Peng pointed out that even though three of the biggest cities in China, which include Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou, have accumulated very large populations, they […]

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December 18 2013

Growing a Garden City: A Book Review on Duany’s Agrarian Urbanism

December 18th, 2013Posted by 

Is agriculture the new golf? Former skeptic Andres Duany says it very well could be. I was fortunate enough to hear Duany speak on his book, “Garden Cities: Theory & Practice of Agrarian Urbanism.” As usual, he didn’t disappoint with his energetic and blunt character that never needs a flashy presentation or pretty pictures to […]

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December 17 2013

Nothern Ireland Considering Demolition of Historically Significant & Listed Buildings

December 17th, 2013Posted by 

Belfast has a vast array of historically important buildings that reflect how the city has evolved. Even though these buildings have been labeled as protected, they are still at risk of demolition. The PAC (Public Accounts Committee) has said that the “body responsible for safeguarding the buildings is not doing enough to protect the most vulnerable.” The […]

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December 03 2013

It’s History, But Not Preserved: The Demolition of The University of Ulster, Belfast

December 3rd, 2013Posted by 

What should happen to worn out buildings? Should they be refurbished or demolished to make way for a new design? Questions like these often come up in situations of regeneration, such as in Belfast with the redevelopment of University of Ulster. The University of Ulster is currently situated in Belfast, but there are also campuses in […]

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December 03 2013

Colombia, the Country of Sweet Coffee, is Becoming the Country of Great Cities

December 3rd, 2013Posted by 

In Colombia, since the beginning of the twentieth century, when one spoke about moving to la gran ciudad (“the great city”), one always referred to Bogotá. This process of migration was historically viewed as a last resort: in a country rich in natural resources, moving to the city was considered a treason to the national […]

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November 27 2013

How Cities Come Alive: A Book Review of “Life Between Buildings”

November 27th, 2013Posted by 

People and buildings are connected – they have been and will continue to be so. Life Between Buildings: Using Public Space is a classic that applies substance and quantitative research to the field of urban planning. Jan Gehl, author of Cities for People, takes his analysis beyond urban design to talk about how public spaces […]

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November 22 2013

Matatus: Nairobi’s Leader of Transportation Since 1973

November 22nd, 2013Posted by 

Mobility, sustainability, and identity are three key elements for good cities. Developed economies enjoy public transport systems with fixed routes, schedules, and pricing; but this is not the case in developing countries. In Africa, citizens use a variety of means to get around, ranging from small minibuses to riding on the back of motorcycles. Nairobi […]

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November 19 2013

A Missing Core: Architectural Education in Northern Ireland

November 19th, 2013Posted by 

Architectural education is vitally important, as both the public and professionals alike can stimulate a collaborative community seeking the best for their future. The diagram below shows how architecture, planning and urbanism, and landscape architecture in the UK are treated as three separate areas. I believe the missing core to this diagram is the education […]

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November 05 2013

Can Architecture Resolve Conflict?: The Legacy of Northern Ireland’s Peace Walls

November 5th, 2013Posted by 

A key element within architecture that can create a beautiful sense of enclosure or an intimidating space, are walls. In Northern Ireland the wall symbolises a history of conflict and separation, associated with the violent events of The Troubles. The conflict was territorial, not religious, between Irish Nationalist (mostly self-identified as Irish and/or Roman Catholic) […]

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November 04 2013

Above the Freeway, Dallas’ Klyde Warren Park Celebrates One Year

November 4th, 2013Posted by 

Texas is full of clichés. From “Everything’s bigger in…” to the familiar cowboy caricature, Texas is synonymous with a culture that characteristically ostentatious and southern. Maybe more than any of the state’s other major destinations, Dallas carries the consequence of an epic television show of the same name – glamorizing the state’s many eccentricities through […]

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