June 27 2013

Planning Steps into the Spotlight: Walkable City Book Review

June 27th, 2013Posted by 

If you’re a planner and have tried to explain to everyday folks the importance of good planning, then you know it can be a difficult topic to interest them. Most either find the planning profession to be too regulatory or know nothing about it at all. In Jeff Speck’s Walkable City: How Downtown can Save […]

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June 12 2013

Crowdsourcing the Evolution of an Industrial Neighborhood: The Granary District’s Journey at The Congress for the New Urbanism’s CNU21

June 12th, 2013Posted by 

James Alfandre, Kentlands Initiative James Alfandre, Executive Director at the Kentlands Initiative, opened the session by defining crowdsourcing. He thinks of crowdsourcing as an “open call to an undefined group of people.” It’s essentially Wikipedia’s open source model applied to urban revitalization and development. Alfandre said that there are two major steps to creating the […]

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April 24 2013

The Hidden Costs of Highways: How The Investment of Vehicle Orientated Infrastructure is Affecting our Health

April 24th, 2013Posted by 

Our mobility is bound by the linkages available to us and the built environment that surrounds us. But how does our transportation choices in our city affect our health and well being ? This is a question that is gaining prevalence as cities grow, densify and complicate the daily journey of urban dwellers. A report […]

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April 19 2013

Farewell From Bonnie Rodd: Blogging from Austin, TX

April 19th, 2013Posted by 

In the summer of 2012 I was a fresh graduate from the University of Texas at Austin, trying to make my way into the working world. Having been an Urban Studies student minoring in Architecture, I was hopeful I would be able to find work in which I could apply my passion for urban development, […]

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April 08 2013

A Short River Story from Athens, Greece

April 8th, 2013Posted by 

Kifisos is a principal watercourse of the Attica basin which springs from mountains of Parnitha and Penteli, run through downtown Athens and eventually discharges into Saronikos Bay. Just before emptying into the sea, for a stretch of 20klm, river Kifisos has been regrettably covered by transportation infrastructure as means to avoid expensive expropriations. At its […]

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April 05 2013

Great Expectations: The Power of Empowering the Impoverished

April 5th, 2013Posted by 

When you think of tough neighbourhoods and burroughs like the Bronx in New York, or St Ann’s in Nottingham, you don’t necessarily equate them with energy efficient living. If you consider it living at all, it is most certainly not energy efficient living. However, it is in Nottingham England that city council has made an […]

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April 02 2013

Floating Life: Is It Achievable?

April 2nd, 2013Posted by 

The Netherlands is a relatively small country, however it has a considerably sizeable population that is currently in and around 16.5 million. This makes it one of the most densely populated countries in the world, with almost 83% living in urban regions. It is an extremely low lying country with about 50% of its land […]

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March 28 2013

James Corner and the Re-Design of Chicago’s Navy Pier

March 28th, 2013Posted by 

James Corner’s Field Operations, renowned designer of New York’s High Line Park, won the design competition for Chicago’s Navy Pier one year ago. The attraction is approaching its centennial in 2016, and the trustees of Navy Pier, Inc. hope the renovations will be completed in time to celebrate. Navy Pier is a major tourist attraction […]

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March 12 2013

In Search of the Urban: Planning for Urbanity in HafenCity, Hamburg

March 12th, 2013Posted by 

The special characteristics of cities and the urban way of life have been of fascination to people for a long time. But what exactly does this idea entail? Urbanity is a concept that is classically associated with modernity, when inner-city industrial spaces became the new centers of living and working, leading to a population boom […]

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March 08 2013

Six “Plus-One” Public Buildings: The Cultural Diversity of Thessaloniki, Greece

March 8th, 2013Posted by 

Thessaloniki, Greece has a rich history. Early Christian and Byzantine monuments, churches, and public buildings, with neoclassical and Baroque architecture, all contribute to the formation of a culturally diverse urban environment. Among them, completely modern edifices (such as the New City Hall) enhance the diversity of the city’s urban structures, while controversy has surrounded them since day one.  The […]

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March 08 2013

A Comparative Look at Austin’s Most Creatively Sustainable Homes

March 8th, 2013Posted by 

KRDB, the architects of the Sol community in East Austin, utilized creative solutions to design homes that address multiple facets of sustainability. Affordability is innate in the Zero-Net Energy homes; the carefully considered designs reduced initial costs, and utility costs are lessened due to their energy efficiency achieved through some unexpected methods listed below. Highly energy efficient […]

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February 22 2013

Welcome to the New Cultural Coast of Thessaloniki, Greece

February 22nd, 2013Posted by 

In the last decade, many architectural projects have come to fruition in Thessaloniki, Greece. One that particularly stands out, and has a special place in many young people’s hearts, is the regeneration of the central pier of the city’s port. This project started in 1997 within the framework of the “European Capital of Culture” program […]

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February 21 2013

Remnants of a Dream in Coral Gables, Florida

February 21st, 2013Posted by 

Diversity is a key ingredient for a successful development, or at least that’s what George Merrick, Founding Father of Coral Gables, believed in 1925. Along with The American Building Company and former Ohio Governor Myers Cooper, he created the largest home development project in that time’s history: the Village Project. At the time, South Florida […]

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December 28 2012

Music, Sound, and Noise: BldgBlog’s Fanciful Survey of Acoustically Inspired Designs

December 28th, 2012Posted by 

“In the elevators of the Empire State Building, you’d hear the elevators of the Eiffel Tower. The sounds of the Paris Metró are replaced with the sounds of the Bejing subway…If you don’t like Rome, you can make it sound like Dubai.” –Geoff Manaugh, The BldgBlog Book In this passage, author Geoff Manaugh introduces his […]

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November 22 2012

The Ghetto in the Sky: From Slum Removal to Urban Renewal in Minneapolis, Minnesota

November 22nd, 2012Posted by 

One of the most iconic viewsheds in Minneapolis – hated by some, loved by others – are any that include the Riverside Plaza apartments. From many places in the city you can see the Brutalist concrete buildings, with their primary-color panels and blockish tower-structure, towering above their surroundings. In 2010, Riverside Plaza was included in […]

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November 12 2012

A City Center for the People: Athens, Greece

November 12th, 2012Posted by 

“Rethink Athens” is a project organized and funded by the “Onassis Foundation” whose objective is to improve the everyday life of Athenian citizens, by transforming the center of the Greek capital. “Rethink Athens” will be realized by a European competition which will indicate a winning architect (person or legal entity) to undertake the design of a […]

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October 24 2012

United Nations Building: Copenhagen, Denmark

October 24th, 2012Posted by 

“The water in itself adds quality to this city”, Kim Herforth Nielsen, 3XN The United Nations committee reaches worldwide, currently covering 193 member states. Its foundations were set following the end of the Second World War, when 51 countries committed to invest their power in the welfare organization. The declaration formulated in the Millenium Summit […]

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August 08 2012

Is Human Scale Important to Cities Without Skyscrapers?

August 8th, 2012Posted by 

Cities are built for a variety of reasons, but are ultimately places for people to live, work, and play. As such, architects and urban planners need to keep in mind the concept of human scale, or designing buildings and spaces for human use. This impacts everything from the height of buildings to the size of […]

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July 18 2012

How to Promote your Firm on LinkedIn: Architects, Urban Planners

July 18th, 2012Posted by 

Your firm can use the popular professional networking site LinkedIn for much more than your standard Facebook ‘like’ page. Facebook is casual and is viewable by all whom may be interested in your firm. LinkedIn provides a professional atmosphere online with many specific tools and resources to help your business and employees. Here are four tips […]

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July 10 2012

A Farewell from Jordan Meerdink

July 10th, 2012Posted by 

From a simple submissions post on my college jobs board, I began my writing internship for Global Site Plans in May 2011. As an undergrad I had dipped my feet in creative writing, authoring several articles for student publications, however blogging for The Grid was to be a new experience unlike any I had undertaken […]

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