Comments on: Is Legal Marijuana a Problem for Urban Planners? http://www.globalsiteplans.com/content/is-legal-marijuana-a-problem-for-urban-planners/ Branding for Architecture, Engineering, Environmental Non-Profits, Landscape Architecture, & Urban Planning Companies Wed, 26 Aug 2015 03:37:28 +0000 hourly 1 By: Jonathan Knight http://www.globalsiteplans.com/content/is-legal-marijuana-a-problem-for-urban-planners/comment-page-1/#comment-94793 Thu, 17 Apr 2014 14:12:35 +0000 http://globalsiteplans.com/?p=35677#comment-94793 Hi Raghu, thank you for your comments. You made some excellent points and, I think, some valid arguments.

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By: Raghu Krishnan http://www.globalsiteplans.com/content/is-legal-marijuana-a-problem-for-urban-planners/comment-page-1/#comment-94728 Thu, 17 Apr 2014 03:17:04 +0000 http://globalsiteplans.com/?p=35677#comment-94728 Don’t get me wrong, I’m all in favor of legalizing marijuana. I think we’re behind on this and alcohol has been the only legal recreational drug for far too long with too many injuries and fatalities in every age group whether self inflicted or inflicted upon others. That being said, I’m happy Colorado and Washington are enjoying the new found freedom. And in the near term there will be at least another handful of states joining them. With an abundance of medical marijuana institutions already in place and now the state law allowing recreational use the number of stores has dramatically increased. Will these states become the “farms” for cultivation of marijuana supplying the rest of the country? Or will the number of stores stabilize and level off as people realize there’s too much competition between each other and go back to being entrepreneurial in other ways. And when will that happen. There are a million and one ways to “flavor” marijuana and it’ll end up being like the frozen yogurt craze so that every pioneer feels entitled to a piece of the pie. This is going to get in the way of city planning unless permits/licenses become limited in each city like a liquor license at a bar. Once that happens, then planning can be scheduled much better and be more creative. BUT…there will always be a conservative population of entrepreneurs or corporations that will not want to set up shop anywhere near a drug company. It’s their vision that being around marijuana is a dangerous element and will provoke criminal activity like gangs seeking out large amounts of cash, which marijuana stores tend to keep. Independent store owners who set up shop next to a ganja store may not be able to afford security measures to feel safe and chain stores are most likely of the conservative mentality not to set up shop anywhere near a dispensary in the first place. So how will city planning work? I’m sure over time the tide will change and planning will successfully revolve around marijuana stores. But what about the here and now, especially with the drug still being illegal at the federal level? It’s a good question being posed and I’m curious about how cities will evolve around the new recreational drug in town.

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