Archive for the ‘Landscape Architecture’ Category

May 28 2014

Another Unreasonable Project: The Golden Horn Tunnel

May 28th, 2014Posted by 

A sub-sea tunnel is being planned to replace Unkapani Bridge as part of a project very much like that which occurred in Taksim to move streets underground. I sincerely wonder who proposed this “genius” project. I guess the contractors are at work again. The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, who was reckless enough to build an unnecessary horned bridge by the […]

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May 27 2014

Social Housing as a Solution to the Ecological Impasse, France

May 27th, 2014Posted by 

I have already thought, and on a number of occasions, to support the construction of social housing on this blog. But beyond the preconceptions, very often caricature-esque, which would render a left-wing activist as a “public” and collective housing partisan because he is “social” by nature, while a right-wing activist would be defending the rise […]

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May 21 2014

Madison Envisions Pedestrian-Friendly City, Dreams of Moving Traffic Underground

May 21st, 2014Posted by 

Most Madisonians know one of the most beautiful views in Madison is from John Nolen Drive - named for the famous landscape architect who helped plan the city over a hundred years ago. A portion of the drive is surrounded by water on both sides and provides an incredibly breathtaking view of the state capitol building […]

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May 08 2014

The Extraordinary Character of Former Refugee Houses in Athens, Greece

May 8th, 2014Posted by 

As distinctive examples of Modern architecture, the former refugee houses in Athens can be described as the prelude to the city’s contemporary urban development. Although they have earned a place in Modern Greek history, nowadays these buildings struggle to maintain their existence. The 1920′s forced displacement of the Greek population from Asia Minor to Greece […]

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April 30 2014

Gérard Collomb Reveals His Ambitions for Lyon, Rhône-Alpes, France

April 30th, 2014Posted by 

Recently reelected for the third time as Lyon’s mayor, Gérard Collomb wants things in the city to continue progressing at a brisk pace. The following is an interview with this well-known local politician. Do you consider the overarching theme of your third term to be large urban projects? Gérard Collomb (G.C.): Yes, we are going […]

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April 29 2014

“Green Spots” Sprout up in Thessaloniki, Greece

April 29th, 2014Posted by 

On Palaion Patron Street, in the centre of Thessaloniki, Greece, one can see the first portable garden that has been temporarily installed. This structure, apart from a portable landscape design, is also accompanied by a bench, and aims to change the way that green spaces are created in the populous urban fabric of the city. […]

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April 29 2014

Milan Design Week’s Distinct Venues: Salone de Mobile & Fuorisalone

April 29th, 2014Posted by 

In April of every year, since 1961, Milan’s Design Week takes place; an event that gathers international design makers and lovers from all over the world. The impact on the city’s structure is highly noticeable during the week as the number of tourists and visitors increase, and therefore so does the traffic. The need for getting from […]

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April 25 2014

Preparing for the Worst: Resilience in Washington, D.C.

April 25th, 2014Posted by 

A recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) highlights the fact that the effects of climate change are already transpiring, and that cities will need to adapt to these changes. As a city with large amounts of land residing in a low-elevation coastal zone, the most pressing challenge for Washington, D.C. will […]

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April 23 2014

Why There Are No Trees in the Place du Pantheon or on Rue Soufflot in Paris, France

April 23rd, 2014Posted by 

On March 8th, 2014 the Parti Socialiste’s candidate for the mayorship of Paris announced her redevelopment project for the Place du Panthéon, a square that she considers to be “isolated” and “inaccessible!” Anne Hidalgo intends to plant trees all along Rue Soufflot and in the Panthéon’s very square in order to “arrange shady spaces,” which […]

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April 22 2014

Impressive Villa F in Rhodes, Greece

April 22nd, 2014Posted by 

Any structure at this preferential plot in Rhodes island would undoubtly arouse extreme interest. The area is a few meters away from the coast road and it is bordered by an old natural stone wall, which encloses the whole plot as a “frame” towards the spectacular view to the sea. The summer house “Villa F” was […]

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April 15 2014

Sculptor Alexandros Liapis’ Distinguishable Workshop in the Greek Countryside

April 15th, 2014Posted by 

In an agricultural plot of 4,000 m2, among olive trees, oleanders and cypress trees in Boeotia, the Greek architectural office A31 designed the new workshop of the painter and sculptor Alexandros Liapis. Additionally, part of the surrounding area became an outdoor sculpture gallery, hosting the artist’s creations, which made the whole project a two-fold challenge. […]

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April 14 2014

Melbourne’s Federation Square as a Catalyst for Community Building

April 14th, 2014Posted by 

Melbourne’s Federation square was built in 2002, as a critical response to the failures of past developments on the site. Dating back to the 1960s, with the Gas and Fuel Corporation buildings that occupied the site, the redevelopment sought to connect the city to the waterfront, as well as the important Flinders train station. The […]

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April 11 2014

Water Continues to Define Washington D.C.

April 11th, 2014Posted by 

Water is one of the necessary conditions of life on this planet. That simple fact, along with the important trade routes moving water provides, is why the first human settlements were built along rivers and coasts. It is the only force large enough to give form to the sprawling metropolises that dot the Earth’s landscape. […]

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April 08 2014

World Urban Forum 7: Medellin, Colombia at the Heart of Urban Debates

April 8th, 2014Posted by 

Twenty years after being considered the the most violent city in the world, Medellin is no longer recognized as the most dangerous city, but the most innovative, the most resilient, and an example in planning projects that generate equality. This transformation is the reason Medellin became the host city of the Seventh World Urban Forum, […]

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April 04 2014

Painting the Town Yellow, Green, and Blue: Street Art in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

April 4th, 2014Posted by 

Beyond its inherent associations with youthful disobedience and vandalism, Brazilian graffiti captures a city’s culture and history, its feelings on political or social conditions, as well as a little frivolity and playfulness. A distinction needs to be made therefore between grafite, a street art style focused on aesthetics, and pichação, or tagging, in which early […]

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April 03 2014

Pavement Debates in Kansas City, Missouri

April 3rd, 2014Posted by 

Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, like other metropolitan centers, has higher amounts of parking than its neighboring suburban and rural areas. A majority of the land cover in downtown Kansas City, is made up of off-street, on-street parking or underground parking garages. Parking lots create an opportunity cost issue, in addition to taking up land that could […]

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April 02 2014

Visual Pollution in the City of Athens, Greece: Escaping this Aesthetic Prison

April 2nd, 2014Posted by 

Visiting Athens, Greece, you will hear that the city looks pretty in August or during popular holidays, while half the population is away on vacations. Obviously less people equals less noise and traffic, but is this really the case? Could Athens ever be described as a pretty place? Blinded by the history of Athens, contemporary […]

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April 02 2014

The Couch as Unlikely Street Furniture: In Paris, France and Beyond

April 2nd, 2014Posted by 

For this article we are bringing up an idea that is not exactly new, but still has potential for the comfort of our streets (and for the well-being of our rear-ends, which are ill-served by reinforced concrete benches). Let’s introduce the sofa into public spaces. Sitting Down in Our Cities: Why So Much Hate? Although […]

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April 01 2014

Reconnecting with the Capital Waterfront

April 1st, 2014Posted by 

There is a conspicuous disconnect between Washington, D.C. and its rivers. Apart from the lively strip along the Georgetown Waterfront, an area notoriously difficult for the majority of District residents to access, there have been few places for people to connect with the city’s most important resource, its water. This is because while the city […]

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March 31 2014

3rd Avenue of Limoilou, Quebec, Canada: The Future of the Mall

March 31st, 2014Posted by 

The shopping mall is dead, long live the shopping avenue! That is what an article from January 13th, written by Marie-Ève Fournier for the Montreal newspaper La Presse, seemed to declare. We already know that far from being strictly utilitarian spaces, shopping malls are also destinations for enjoying yourself. Young parents can walk around with […]

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