Archive for the ‘Landscape Architecture’ Category

January 09 2014

A Farewell to The Grid, from Gina Kiani of the East Bay, California

January 9th, 2014Posted by 

It’s hard to believe that my internship with Global Site Plans (GSP) has come to an end. Being a contributor to The Grid has helped me hone my skills as a writer; to more effectively convey and articulate my topics of interest. Focusing on topics of urban planning, through the lens of sustainability and geographic information […]

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January 07 2014

Shanghai’s Fallen Leaves Pose a Tourist Attraction

January 7th, 2014Posted by 

In December 2013, on Wukang Road and Yuqing Road in Shanghai, residents experienced an autumn street scene with fallen leaves. Since these experimental street scenes were implemented, many photographers and tourists have come to visit these streets, and the number of visitors to the area has increased more than 40%, compared with the number last […]

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January 06 2014

The Alleys of Quebec City, Canada: Lagging Behind their Montreal Counterparts

January 6th, 2014Posted by 

The program for beautifying the alleys of Quebec City has found little success in Limoilou. There is so little happening that $600,000 of available funds are sitting in the city’s coffers. “The program does not work at all” explained the official responsible for the report, Sonia Ratté, during a recent plenary committee meeting. “The challenge […]

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January 03 2014

Will Nairobi Maintain its Status as the “Green City in the Sun?”

January 3rd, 2014Posted by 

There is something distinctly noticeable when you look at a map of Nairobi. The southern line of the metropolitan area is bordered by a national park, while the southern line of the Central Business District is bordered by an urban park, golf course, and an array of sports grounds. Nairobi, Kenya is known as the […]

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December 26 2013

Oakland Among Five California Cities Awarded in First Round of Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities

December 26th, 2013Posted by 

The Rockefeller Foundation announced their 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge during their 100th birthday on May 14th, 2013. Following over 1,000 registrations and 400 applications from cities around the world, the first group, having “demonstrated a dedicated commitment to building their own capacities to prepare for, withstand, and bounce back rapidly from shocks and stresses,” […]

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December 26 2013

Cities and Climate Change: Kansas City, MO Perspectives on a Global Issue

December 26th, 2013Posted by 

Cities have gained considerable importance in the dialogue of climate change and environmental sustainability. A majority of the earth’s growing population is projected to live in cities. Not only are they responsible for a majority of earth’s energy and resource consumption, cities also subsequently produces the highest amount of wastes and emissions, and are therefore […]

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December 25 2013

A Farewell to The Grid from Alexandra Serbana

December 25th, 2013Posted by 

As my internship with The Grid is ending and the last month of the year 2013 goes by, I find myself standing at another one of life’s many crossroads. It is a bit ironic that the end of my blogging experience for Milan is due as I am about to leave the city that was […]

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December 23 2013

A Farewell to The Grid, from Allyson McAbee

December 23rd, 2013Posted by 

New Orleans, Louisiana is a small and unique city. Somehow, even with a population of 37,000 people, you will always bump into someone you know. With that said, a sense of community is the constant throughout Nola’s dynamic changes and progress. We all want to be more involved, have a voice within our community, and make […]

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December 19 2013

How Hidden Architectural History Shapes Seattle’s Downtown

December 19th, 2013Posted by 

Louis Sullivan famously stated “Form follows function.” One of the main functions of a downtown building should be to be usable to the public. In Seattle, this is done through privately-owned public spaces and architectural nuances. Sometimes this is obvious; but often the best public spaces are in hidden places. The Seattle Architecture Foundation leads […]

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December 12 2013

Development at University Village at UC Berkeley: Should it Continue to be Stalled?

December 12th, 2013Posted by 

In development since 2007, the UC Village project is still tackling hurdles before the Albany Planning Commission. The mixed-use development on 6.3 acres of land, owned by the University of California Berkeley, is proposed on two parcels of San Pablo Ave.; a grocery store and retail to the North of Monroe Street and a senior […]

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December 12 2013

Financial Feasibility of Green Building Retrofits: The Case of Kansas City, Missouri

December 12th, 2013Posted by 

“Green” or “sustainable” buildings use key resources like energy, water, materials, and land much more efficiently than buildings that are simply built to code. Dimensions such as site planning, indoor environmental air quality, materials, resources and water efficiency are some things these new breeds of built environment take into account. The process begins with the […]

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December 09 2013

Kayaking with Alligators: Ecotourism Louisiana Style

December 9th, 2013Posted by 

The terms “going green” and “ecotourism” have shown up more and more across the globe in design fields such as urban planning, landscape architecture, and environmental non-profits. Although this idea of environmentalism has been around since John Muir, in mid-1800s, these terms today provide updated ideas about conservation and preservation. Ecotourism falls within this green […]

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December 04 2013

“Recent Waterscapes: Planning, Building, and Designing with Water” Book Review

December 4th, 2013Posted by 

Recent Waterscapes: Planning, Building, and Designing with Water edited by Herbert Dreiseitl and Dieter Grau provides a comprehensive overview of innovative water-related projects throughout the world. The editors argue: “Coping with ever greater amounts of stormwater run-off from increased urbanization and fierce heavy downpours does not mean endlessly multiplying the number and capacity of technical […]

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December 03 2013

Green Roof Policies Stumble in Guangzhou, China

December 3rd, 2013Posted by 

Guangzhou has carried out the green roof policy for more than one decade, but the implementation has encountered challenges. A report released by the Guangzhou Institute of Landscape Gardening showed that the green roof area of ​​Guangzhou accounted for an estimated total area of ​​only 0.5%, which is far less than Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. […]

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November 28 2013

A Self-Contained Urban Lot: Food, Water, Electricity & Community in Kansas City

November 28th, 2013Posted by 

In mid-2008, DST Systems planned to construct a rain garden at 18th and Broadway, in the historic Crossroads Art District just south of downtown Kansas City, MO. Partnering with 360 Architecture, the plans evolved to showcase the sustainability of living spaces and green practices, transforming a vacant lot into a self-resourceful and reliant innovative urban community garden […]

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November 27 2013

Is Parco Sud a Park or Agricultural Land?: A Southern Milan Debate

November 27th, 2013Posted by 

Parks have always been considered as green spaces for recreational use. Lately, urban planning policies have been expanding their definition by providing significant attention to different types of green spaces across the city – and their functionalities. “The Rural Park of South Milan,” also known as “Parco Sud,” is an example of how diverse a park can […]

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November 19 2013

How Cali, Colombia Learned from Bogotá’s and Medellín’s Mistakes

November 19th, 2013Posted by 

In previous posts I have written about two cities in Colombia that have experienced tremendous changes and have excellent perspectives for a promising future in the context of the new development of Colombia. Time Magazine has coined this the ‘Colombian Comeback.’ But yet another city in Colombia is taking part in this comeback, and it has […]

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November 14 2013

California’s Environmental Goals and Policy Report Finally Released

November 14th, 2013Posted by 

Since resuming Governor of California, the Environmental Goals and Policy Report (EGPR) was released under Jerry Brown thirty years behind schedule. The Governor’s Office of Planning & Research typically releases the report every four years, but has not completed drafted attempts since Brown’s last term in 1978. This report, titled California’s Climate Future, defines targets […]

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November 14 2013

State Transportation Grant Bolsters Long-Awaited Sonoma Valley Bike Trail

November 14th, 2013Posted by 

How incredible would it be to explore Sonoma Valley and its hundreds of wineries without spending a dime on gas or expensive tours?  Apparently it would be pretty incredible, judging by a recent state-funded grant to develop the Sonoma Valley Bike Trail, which will connect the regions wineries and parks. The $191,000 Community-Based Transportation Grant […]

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November 12 2013

Greening Lower Grand Avenue: Community Visioning Gone Right

November 12th, 2013Posted by 

In a city infamous for auto-oriented development, muddled identity, and isolated suburbs, one neighborhood in Phoenix, Arizona has epitomized what it means to spark community revitalization. Lower Grand Avenue is a mile-long corridor adjacent to the city’s downtown. Like most of the urban core, the neighborhood has a long history of disinvestment; however, in the […]

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