Archive for the ‘Land Use’ Category

April 23 2014

Fighting Over Jet Planes: Toronto’s Downtown Airport Expansion

April 23rd, 2014Posted by 

Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (BBTCA) is a small airport located on the Toronto Islands in Toronto, Ontario. Canada’s ninth busiest airport, the BBTCA currently accommodates more than two million business and leisure travelers annually. It also has the distinction of being the only airport located entirely within Toronto’s boundaries. In 1983, the City of […]

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April 22 2014

Food Waste Regulations in Cork, Ireland

April 22nd, 2014Posted by 

In December 2009, the Minister for the Environment signed the Waste Management (Food Waste) Regulations 2009 (S.I. No 508 of 2009). These regulations were enforced July 1, 2010 and required all major sources of food waste to be placed into dedicated bins and to ensure that it was not mixed with other waste. As per […]

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April 21 2014

Tactical Urbanism in Laval, Quebec, Canada

April 21st, 2014Posted by 

On April 1st, two students of architecture and urban design at the University of Laval launched their project of tactical urbanism #chaisesnomades on the school’s campus. And it was no April Fool’s joke! “Tactical urbanism is a movement popularized in the United States” explained Alexandre Boulianne and Jean-François Laroche, the individuals behind the project. “It’s […]

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April 17 2014

BIDs Reshaping D.C.’s Future One Neighborhood at a Time

April 17th, 2014Posted by 

Since the mid 90’s, Washington, D.C. has been allowing commercially concentrated areas to band together to form Business Improvement Districts (B.I.Ds) throughout the city. These organizations charge a fee to their members in order to provide supplemental services. Typically, this includes improved street cleaning and safety, BID ambassadors to help visitors find their way around, […]

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April 15 2014

Today’s Urban Encyclopedia: “The American City: What Works, What Doesn’t”

April 15th, 2014Posted by 

As cities grow and redevelop, community leaders are constantly imagining new ideas to improve their businesses and neighborhoods. But who is keeping track of all these new sustainability programs, zoning policies, and preservation programs? Evaluating past and existing practices can help avoid repeated mistakes and spur innovative partnerships. However, the volume and diversity of urban […]

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April 11 2014

Double Decker Highway: Good or Bad for Nairobi?

April 11th, 2014Posted by 

It is not news that there is a planned double decker highway for the City of Nairobi. Many people see the project as progressive and a potential solution to the traffic congestion problems. Only a few are asking whether it is really a long-term solution to our traffic menace and whether there are other more […]

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April 10 2014

Sycamore Park: An Example of Innovation in Redmond, Washington

April 10th, 2014Posted by 

New housing developments in the suburbs are not usually a beacon of innovation. But as cities strive to increase housing choice, encourage better design and strengthen their community, that often means a change to the typical suburban model. Redmond, Washington, a neighbor to the east of Seattle, is taking a step in this direction. A […]

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April 09 2014

Maryland’s Septics Law Highlights Differences of Rural and Urban Communities

April 9th, 2014Posted by 

Maryland’s Sustainable Growth & Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012, also known as the septics law, widened the divide between rural and urban communities in the state. The law is part of a bundle of programs pushed through within the last decade to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Some of these initiatives include: Enhanced […]

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April 09 2014

Urban Renewal to Shape a “New” Downtown in Bogota, Colombia

April 9th, 2014Posted by 

As the capital city of one of the most violent countries in the world during the 1980s and 1990s, Bogota was not considered an interesting place to travel. The negative imagery of Bogota was comprised of rioting, gang- and drug-related violence, as well as deteriorated buildings and public spaces. Nonetheless, Bogota has been considered a […]

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April 08 2014

World Urban Forum 7: Medellin, Colombia at the Heart of Urban Debates

April 8th, 2014Posted by 

Twenty years after being considered the the most violent city in the world, Medellin is no longer recognized as the most dangerous city, but the most innovative, the most resilient, and an example in planning projects that generate equality. This transformation is the reason Medellin became the host city of the Seventh World Urban Forum, […]

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April 08 2014

Protestors in Athens Take to the Streets as Landfill Development Continues

April 8th, 2014Posted by 

With what criteria should we evaluate which places make perfect wastelands? Should we continue burdening an already polluted area or should we create new sites of pollution? There is not a more igniting local issue than the waste management of Athens and Attica, particularly these days anticipating the Greek Municipal Elections of May 2014. With […]

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April 03 2014

Pavement Debates in Kansas City, Missouri

April 3rd, 2014Posted by 

Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, like other metropolitan centers, has higher amounts of parking than its neighboring suburban and rural areas. A majority of the land cover in downtown Kansas City, is made up of off-street, on-street parking or underground parking garages. Parking lots create an opportunity cost issue, in addition to taking up land that could […]

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April 02 2014

Visual Pollution in the City of Athens, Greece: Escaping this Aesthetic Prison

April 2nd, 2014Posted by 

Visiting Athens, Greece, you will hear that the city looks pretty in August or during popular holidays, while half the population is away on vacations. Obviously less people equals less noise and traffic, but is this really the case? Could Athens ever be described as a pretty place? Blinded by the history of Athens, contemporary […]

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April 01 2014

Reconnecting with the Capital Waterfront

April 1st, 2014Posted by 

There is a conspicuous disconnect between Washington, D.C. and its rivers. Apart from the lively strip along the Georgetown Waterfront, an area notoriously difficult for the majority of District residents to access, there have been few places for people to connect with the city’s most important resource, its water. This is because while the city […]

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April 01 2014

Fifteen Greek Celebrities Choose the Most Liveable Parts of Thessaloniki, Greece

April 1st, 2014Posted by 

1. Victor Arditis, director – theatrologist, senior lecturer in AUTH, Artistic Director of NTNG - National Theatre of Northern Greece (2001-2004). “The best place is exactly where I currently live: in the area among Olgas – Nikolaidis-Antheon-Sofouli with the poplars and the plane trees, that create an excellent micro-climate. Or I would choose the decadent upper […]

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March 28 2014

The Risky Affair of Cycling in Nairobi, Kenya

March 28th, 2014Posted by 

2013 Tour de France winner Chris Froome first started cycling as a boy in Kenya. Cycling is an equitable and low-cost form of mobility, although it can be a dangerous activity in cities like Nairobi. Many cities around the world have long recognized the importance of cycling as a way of mobility.  The City of […]

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March 28 2014

Moving the Capital: Public Transit in Washington, D.C.

March 28th, 2014Posted by 

The Washington, D.C. Metro is recognized as the trademark transit system of the capital city, but it is hardly a befitting one. With frequent breakdowns, and delays due to track work, it is a consistent source of frustration for the region’s commuters. Coupling this with the fact that it is currently operating over capacity during […]

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March 27 2014

The Fight Over Parking Minimums in Seattle

March 27th, 2014Posted by 

Most people love free parking, so it’s no surprise why there is a controversy when urban planners want to build less. In Seattle, former mayor Mike McGinn lost his campaign for reelection, with his parking policies as a major factor. Some went as far as to call it a “war on cars,” and some alluded […]

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March 27 2014

A Mystery Manor of Thessaloniki Becomes Poster Promotion

March 27th, 2014Posted by 

It could easily be a promotion of the city or a circuit of the mystery manors, of which there are plenty, but it’s not. The poster’s info states ‘the mystery manor is assumed to be in New Orleans’ (it is unknown why somebody would claim that it is there).  ‘American Horror Story,’ an American horror […]

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March 27 2014

Can Denver’s Ambitious Light-Rail Plan Meet its 2018 Completion Deadline?

March 27th, 2014Posted by 

In 1993, Denver, Colorado did not have a single light-rail line in its metro area. By October 1994, it had a 5.3-mile track operating on what is now the D line - Denver’s first light-rail line. In 2004, Denver voters approved a $4.7B initiative sales tax increase called “FasTracks” to provide funding for a rapid transit system […]

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