Archive for the ‘Infrastructure’ Category

July 04 2014

The Underground City: Beneath the Surface of Montreal, Quebec

July 4th, 2014Posted by 

The name “Underground City” draws images of a thriving metropolis lying deep beneath city streets. Instead, these subterranean spaces contain a network of links to transportation, commercial, recreational, and residential uses. Though underground cities exist all around the world, what makes Montreal’s system of corridors and tunnels stand out from the rest? It is officially […]

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July 03 2014

Red Line Light Rail Plans Spark Needed Discussion Across Baltimore

July 3rd, 2014Posted by 

The City of Baltimore has a lot of problems, just some of which officials hope to solve with fourteen miles of new light rail. The new Red Line project will be the city’s second light rail line, this time connecting the long-neglected southwest Baltimore to the downtown area and through to southeastern neighborhoods. The hope […]

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July 01 2014

Three Querns Preserved & Operating Again on Patmos Island, Greece

July 1st, 2014Posted by 

In places with few residents, nicknames are extremely common. Patmos’ citizens tenderly call the architect Dafni Becket “Mylomama” (meaning the mother of querns). The reason for this nickname is because this Greek woman, who was a child of diaspora (from a mother who comes from Athens and an American dad, she grew up in Geneva) […]

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July 01 2014

From the Last Council Meeting of the Saint-Merri Neighborhood, Paris

July 1st, 2014Posted by 

The last meeting of the council of the Saint-Merri neighborhood was an opportunity for the municipality of the 4th Arrondisement to speak – plans on the boards – about the adjustments to the study concerning access to the Saint-Merri pool and school. “Vivre le Marais!” has not stopped discussing the upkeep and cleanliness issues now […]

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July 01 2014

The First Public Building Green Façade in Buenos Aires, Argentina

July 1st, 2014Posted by 

As presented in numerous previous posts, the City of Buenos Aires has embarked on a series of measures towards comprehensive green management policies. With the recently approved Green Roofs law, the expansion of bike paths, and zero waste plans, the current government has taken sustainability practices as part of its ideology. Therefore, when it was announced that they […]

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June 30 2014

The Development and Use of Nairobi’s Urban Commuter Rail

June 30th, 2014Posted by 

One of the most interesting recent developments in Kenya is the budgetary allocation by the Kenyan Government for an urban commuter railway. This came under the drive to improve productivity and competitiveness through investment in modern transport and logistic networks. A few weeks prior to this, the Governor of Nairobi launched the Nairobi Integrated Master Plan […]

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June 27 2014

Cycle or Psycho Paths: Ft. Worth, Texas’ New Bike Share

June 27th, 2014Posted by 

Is there room for a bike share in a largely car-dependent area? With the exception of a few dense areas, North Texas is notorious for its sprawl and car-dependency. Despite Dallas activists working to tear down a highway to create greater walkability and the city’s recent approval of connective bike lanes, the culture of people-centered mobility continues to grow […]

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June 27 2014

Ottawa Lacks Safe City Cycling Infrastructure, Focuses on Recreation

June 27th, 2014Posted by 

Stretched over a large area in low-density residential suburbs, Ottawa is not an easy place to plan efficient cycling infrastructure. Indeed, the city’s low-density form means that cycling here often takes particular characteristics, different from more compact Canadian cities like Toronto and Montréal. Depending on what you are looking for, Ottawa’s cycling network is at […]

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June 26 2014

Athenians Continue to Fight for a Bike Lane Network

June 26th, 2014Posted by 

In Athens, Greece, cyclists raise their voices for their safety and rights. Authorities return that there is no room in Athens for bicycles. But it’s more correct to say that “there is no more room for cars in Athens - and plenty of room for bicycles!” The topic of bike lanes is more commonly encountered in mayoral pre-election […]

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June 25 2014

Wisconsin’s Own Copenhagen? Madison’s Blossoming Bicycle Infrastructure

June 25th, 2014Posted by 

Though Madison, Wisconsin is covered in a deep layer of ice and snow for almost half of the year, it doesn’t stop many of the city’s hardiest bicyclists. No matter if it’s a beautiful June afternoon or a bitterly cold March day, you will always find a dedicated crew of commuters traversing the city’s vast […]

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June 25 2014

Knowing Your Bike Lanes from Sharrows in the City of Baltimore, Maryland

June 25th, 2014Posted by 

The City of Baltimore was one of the early adopters of sharrows, lanes shared by cyclists and drivers and marked with a bike-and-chevron design. Some of the original sharrows along University Parkway and Roland Avenue have since been repainted or were replaced with designated bike lanes, as shown in a video from 2009. The City’s […]

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June 24 2014

Saint Lawrence River & Montreal’s Old Port Await their Opportunity to Shine

June 24th, 2014Posted by 

With the arrival of summer, the tourist season, and the 375th anniversary of Montreal, I cannot help but restart the discussion about the future of our Old Port once again. The site must be the most frequented tourist destination in the province (at least six million visitors each year at Igloofest, fireworks, etc.) – it’s […]

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June 20 2014

Persons with Disabilities Largely Ignored in African Cities

June 20th, 2014Posted by 

Recent up-market building construction in the City of Nairobi has made a big effort to accommodate persons with disability, the sick and the elderly. Ramps for those who may have a problem using stairs, braille buttons, vocal instructions in lifts for the visually impaired, and even special washrooms for these vulnerable groups are some of […]

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June 20 2014

LEED in Dallas, Texas Focuses on Buildings, Lacks Neighborhood Sustainability

June 20th, 2014Posted by 

Can urbanism separate itself from the imperative of climate change? In North Texas, walkable areas become oases of activity in the expanse of suburban development. Areas such as The Shops at Legacy in Plano, and the Uptown area inside Dallas city limits, are examples of popular high-density mixed use development. While these areas conserve land […]

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June 19 2014

Acropolis Museum Celebrates its 5th Birthday!: Athens, Greece

June 19th, 2014Posted by 

In no other museum of the country can one witness such joy. Children are whispering like little birds in front of the video that is showing the “Kores,” which were projected on housing blocks during the museum’s opening in 2009. Their parents seem truly touched while they watch how pieces of the Sacred Rock were transferred […]

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June 18 2014

A New Beginning for the Parc du Vallon in Lyon, Rhônes-Alpes, France

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

Situated in the heart of the Duchère neighborhood in the 9th arrondissement of Lyon, the Parc du Vallon reopened its doors on the week of June 6th after three years of work. A vast green space of 11 hectares, it is an area conducive to relaxation, while also absorbing the site’s topography and preserving the […]

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June 18 2014

The Bay Bridge Deconstruction: Can Demolition Be Sustainable?

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

San Francisco’s Bay Bridge, which has served as a work-horse for the bay area since 1936, is undergoing demolition to make way for a more contemporary counterpart. The new bridge is already becoming a world icon claiming its spot as one of the most seismically advanced structures in the world. It is the world’s longest and […]

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June 17 2014

Train Stations: Matrices of the 19th Century Parisian Imagination

June 17th, 2014Posted by 

From 1837 to 1914, railway stations covered Paris; they were a new kind of space, half-industrial and half-urban. This transplant profoundly transformed the landscape, but also the nature of the city, its functions and its place in the national and international arena. Under the Second Empire, the city was reconfigured around these new, modern “gates,” […]

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June 17 2014

Use of Public Transportation in Brazil Dropped 25% in Past 15 Years

June 17th, 2014Posted by 

The lack of adequate transportation policies and the frequent increase in taxes, as well as an increased purchasing power, caused a 25% drop in the use of public transport in Brazil in the last 15 years. Depending on the location, it is cheaper to use a motorcycle or a car than public transport. Not coincidentally, […]

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June 16 2014

B-Cycle® Denver: The Bike Sharing Start-Up is Changing Commuting in Denver

June 16th, 2014Posted by 

In previous articles, I have discussed Denver’s attempts to expand transportation alternatives and curb its air pollution problems by expanding light-rail and create a wider portfolio of sustainable transportation choices. When current Colorado governor John Hickenlooper was Mayor of Denver, he announced an ambitious goal to increase the number of Denver residents commuting to work […]

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