Archive for the ‘History/Preservation’ Category

June 20 2014

Guinness’ Social & Recreational Legacy in Dublin, Ireland

June 20th, 2014Posted by 

Guinness has had a significant impact on how both tourists and locals alike enjoy Dublin. With over one million visitors a year, the Guinness Storehouse is the most popular attraction in Ireland.  Along with the Storehouse, Rupert Guinness Hall, St. Stephen’s Green and Iveagh Gardens are all recreational facilities provided to the city of Dublin […]

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June 19 2014

Transitional Shelter Lessons from San Francisco’s 1906 Earthquake

June 19th, 2014Posted by 

What does a transitional shelter do? After a disaster happens, many people are left homeless and need immediate shelter. A transitional shelter is meant to help them transition from temporary relief housing to a more permanent dwelling. Now, what does a transitional shelters actually do? Usually, it sits in the same location and inadequate condition […]

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June 19 2014

Acropolis Museum Celebrates its 5th Birthday!: Athens, Greece

June 19th, 2014Posted by 

In no other museum of the country can one witness such joy. Children are whispering like little birds in front of the video that is showing the “Kores,” which were projected on housing blocks during the museum’s opening in 2009. Their parents seem truly touched while they watch how pieces of the Sacred Rock were transferred […]

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June 19 2014

Temporality, Energy Consumption & Lessons From Lighting in Lyon, France

June 19th, 2014Posted by 

“Temporality Is Essential to Mastering Energy Consumption,” Antoine Bouchet, former director of urban lighting for the City of Lyon from 2003 to 2012. Memories from four decades of light. At the end of March 2014, I had the pleasure of interviewing Antoine Bouchet. This great professional leaves us “a non-exhaustive approach to lighting the City […]

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June 18 2014

A New Beginning for the Parc du Vallon in Lyon, Rhônes-Alpes, France

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

Situated in the heart of the Duchère neighborhood in the 9th arrondissement of Lyon, the Parc du Vallon reopened its doors on the week of June 6th after three years of work. A vast green space of 11 hectares, it is an area conducive to relaxation, while also absorbing the site’s topography and preserving the […]

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June 18 2014

The Bay Bridge Deconstruction: Can Demolition Be Sustainable?

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

San Francisco’s Bay Bridge, which has served as a work-horse for the bay area since 1936, is undergoing demolition to make way for a more contemporary counterpart. The new bridge is already becoming a world icon claiming its spot as one of the most seismically advanced structures in the world. It is the world’s longest and […]

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June 18 2014

The Ethics of Reconstructing a Historic City: Florence, Italy Post World War II

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

During the final battles of the Second World War, the region of  Tuscany in Italy suffered great destruction. The German Army retreated in the historic cities of Florence and Pisa, significant centers for art and architecture, predicting the hesitation of the Allies to bombard them. Surprisingly, only a relatively small part of the original city of […]

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June 17 2014

Train Stations: Matrices of the 19th Century Parisian Imagination

June 17th, 2014Posted by 

From 1837 to 1914, railway stations covered Paris; they were a new kind of space, half-industrial and half-urban. This transplant profoundly transformed the landscape, but also the nature of the city, its functions and its place in the national and international arena. Under the Second Empire, the city was reconfigured around these new, modern “gates,” […]

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June 17 2014

Argentine Government Dismantled Christopher Columbus Statue in Buenos Aires

June 17th, 2014Posted by 

Many say it’s an ideological move, directed towards a reinterpretation of the history of the colonization of the Americas, while others say it’s just a necessary process for the restoration of a monument that is at risk of collapsing. The only thing that is certain regarding historical monuments is that politics is always a factor. In […]

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June 16 2014

When Art Deco Conquered Fes, Morocco

June 16th, 2014Posted by 

Far from the narrow alleys, dead ends, and slopes that wind in the medina of Fes, Morocco, the new city has exhibited completely different architecture since the era of the French Protectorate in 1912. It is in the style of the first artistic movement of architecture and decoration to conquer the world – Art Deco. […]

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June 13 2014

Druid Hill’s Memorial Pool: A Meaningful Green Space in Baltimore

June 13th, 2014Posted by 

A 2007 article from Landscape and Urban Planning defines a few of the many roles intended in landscape architecture when planning public parks and gardens: Supporting biodiversity and providing ecosystem services; Providing urban residents with natural environments; Influencing the physical and mental well-being of users; and Offering social benefits and a shared space within diverse […]

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June 11 2014

The Historical Train Stations of Istanbul, Turkey: Preserve or Renovate?

June 11th, 2014Posted by 

Before the Bosphorus Bridge was built in 1973, Haydarpasa Terminal was the intersection point of the European and Asian sides of Istanbul. People used to take the train from Anatolia, and move on to the ferry at Haydarpasa to reach the European side. After the construction of the bridge, road transportation became more frequently used and […]

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June 10 2014

A Project for Fighting Against the Nuisances in the Saint-Catherine Market Square

June 10th, 2014Posted by 

On several instances (notably in the articles published on July 23 and Sept. 10, 2013), we have mentioned the Saint-Catherine Market Square (4th Arrondisement), France, and the concerning problems that the residents encounter because of the outdoor seating areas of the numerous bars and restaurants within its perimeter. Pierre Colboc, an architect and president of […]

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June 10 2014

Residence Surrounding Excavations in Ancient Corinth, Greece

June 10th, 2014Posted by 

This residence of 210 square meters is located in Ancient Corinth, Greece, in a plot where many archaeological digs have taken place. The main parameters of the design for the residence were to preserve the excavation “spirit” of the plot and the interconnection of the house with the historically interesting surroundings. The building has a […]

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June 09 2014

The Revitilization of Fitzgerald Park in Cork, Ireland & The Value of Open Space

June 9th, 2014Posted by 

“There has been mixed opinions about greening buildings here and the support is very different to that in the UK” says Bernie Connolly, Boomerang Mattress Scheme Co-ordinator, “even though these are very valuable in terms of employment; and in terms of their social and community benefits.” She goes on to say “that a lot of […]

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June 09 2014

La Rue Royale of Orléans, Centre, France: A Beginner’s Guide

June 9th, 2014Posted by 

Construction began in 1753 with expropriations, demolitions, then construction of the façades. The entirety of the project was financed by the city. Two successive loans amounting to a total of 400,000 pounds were necessary to complete the work. This program was part of a larger royal desire to modernize and beautify the French road network […]

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June 06 2014

Guinness’ Impact on Dublin’s Public Housing: The Iveagh Trust & Hostel

June 6th, 2014Posted by 

There is no brand that is more closely associated with Ireland, and in particular Dublin, than Guinness.  The company has made an impact on the culture, economy, architecture and history of the city in an immeasurable amount of ways. In the city, most Dubliners would recognize the footprint of the Guinness Brewery on the architecture […]

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June 05 2014

How Modernist French Apartment Complexes Could Attain Legitimacy As Heritage

June 5th, 2014Posted by 

Today, it is confirmed that the great French apartment complexes, made up in large part of social housing, have seen more than 30 years, as well as the first riots, which were central to neighborhoods in the suburbs of Lyon. These were what the media then called “the hot summer of Minguettes” – a socially […]

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June 04 2014

Architecture of Taksim as a Reflection of Turkish Government Policies

June 4th, 2014Posted by 

Freedom of speech is not separate from the right to public spaces. Public spaces are where individuals and societies express themselves. These spaces can be physical, like Taksim Square, or virtual, like Twitter. The freer the city squares, the streets and the parks, the more comfortable individuals will be to express themselves. In Turkey, the […]

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June 04 2014

An Architecture of the Exterior: The Renaissance Church Facade

June 4th, 2014Posted by 

The urban environment of historic Florence, Italy is strongly defined by the numerous majestic churches, and the piazzas around them. It’s almost impossible for the visitor to remember all of their names, but the impression of the typical white, red and green marbles of their façades remains indelible in the mind. There are however some […]

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