Archive for the ‘History/Preservation’ Category

March 14 2014

Revitalizing Dublin’s “Georgian Mile:” Controversy Surrounds ESB Headquarters

March 14th, 2014Posted by 

In 1965, despite significant protests, sixteen Georgian buildings were demolished in central Dublin to make way for the new Electricity Supply Board (ESB) Headquarters. The houses were part of the world’s longest Georgian streetscape, commonly known as Dublin’s Georgian Mile. Today, in place of the Georgian buildings, now stands an imposing brutalist office block by […]

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March 14 2014

“Hatches, Matches, and Dispatches” Building of Kenya Continues to Stand

March 14th, 2014Posted by 

A city may start as a few shops, a road junction or even a railway station. The City of Nairobi is no exception. Starting as a railway headquarters in a swampy area, it has grown to a huge cosmopolitan concrete jungle. The historical growth and initial urban design of the city can be appreciated through […]

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March 14 2014

The Galataport Project and the Transformation of Karakoy in Istanbul, Turkey

March 14th, 2014Posted by 

In the shadow of the recently opened Marmaray Sirkeci station, there lies Karakoy, with generous speculation surrounding the potential success of the Galataport Project. The Galataport Project is a cruise project which includes the development of an art museum, hotels, restaurants, bars, fast food joints, souvenir shops, shopping centers, office spaces, exhibition and fair areas […]

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March 13 2014

Exploring the City: Palais Ermeion in Thessaloniki, Greece

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

At Venizeloy Street 23, between Ermou and Egnatia Street, one can find Palais Ermeion. This edifice, which demonstrates the glory of eclectic architecture, was built in the 1920s and designed by the architects S. Milonas and A. Georgakopoulos. The most impressive part of the building is the arresting gate that leads to a lodge, named […]

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March 13 2014

Former Factories Receive a Second Life in Waterloo, Ontario

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

When we think of old buildings, images of dilapidated, abandoned structures come to mind. Often, for the sake of progress, old buildings are demolished, and a part of the city’s history turns to dust. However, in the city of Waterloo, Ontario, some old buildings are given a new lease of life through the practice of […]

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March 13 2014

What the Seahawk’s Super Bowl Victory Did for Historic Preservation in Seattle

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

It is not our reputation here in Seattle to get too wild. But after the Seahawks dominated in our first Super Bowl this year, we had to take the streets. While I watched from below, dozens climbed and rallied on top of the century-old Pergola (pictured below), breaking panes of its fragile glass. But fans […]

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March 12 2014

La Poste du Louvre: A Building in Paris, France that Demands Special Classification

March 12th, 2014Posted by 

La Poste du Louvre’s austere façades are emblematic of an architectural rationalism unique to France. Julien Guadet, student of the famed Henri Labrouste, designed the building. As a studio director at École des Beaux-Arts for more than thirty years, Guadet was the author of Elements and Theory of Architecture which served as a bible for […]

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March 12 2014

Industrial Mills of Jones Falls Redeveloped for a New Baltimore

March 12th, 2014Posted by 

My previous blog discussed the chronic undercrowding in the City of Baltimore and the current plans to reverse it by charming homebuyers with reduced property tax rates. The City has also been charming developers of the once abandoned stone mills clustered around Jones Falls. The lure is still tax related, but this time in the […]

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March 11 2014

The Uncertain Future of a Landmark Victorian Building in Belfast, Ireland

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

It’s historical preservation week at The Grid and in Belfast, a landmark Victorian building is facing an uncertain future. In the city centre, the former Swanston’s Linen Warehouse has recently been denied demolition after the third bid to tear the warehouse down. The future of the building had been the subject of a legal row […]

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March 11 2014

Is the Work of Colombian Architect Rogelio Salmona Destined to Ruins?

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

Rogelio Salmona is recognized as one of the most important architects of Latin America. For over fifty years, his works and thoughts guided the formation of hundreds of architects who find in them an expression that is both in tune with contemporary trends and traditional sensibilities, with the cultural characteristics of the place in which […]

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March 11 2014

Nairobi Old Estates: A Glance at the Ofafa Jericho Eastlands

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

The City of Nairobi owes its development to the Kenya to Uganda Railway project, initiated by the colonialists in 1896. The railway ran from the coastal town of Mombasa to Kenya’s neighbor country Uganda. The town was then demarcated around 1905 through racial segregation and land was designated to different races; the Europeans, Indians, and […]

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March 10 2014

A New Urban Park for Foch Avenue in Paris, France?

March 10th, 2014Posted by 

The designers for a proposed development on Foch Avenue, the Constructions et Développements urbains (CDU) company and the architectural firm Hamonic, Masson, and Associates, summarized the birth of their project with the following words: “Everything started with a gut-feeling. While smoking a cigarette outside of a restaurant in Paris’ 16th arrondissement during a summer night […]

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March 10 2014

Book Review: ‘Rebel Cities’ by David Harvey

March 10th, 2014Posted by 

David Harvey is unabashedly political in his book Rebel Cities, published in 2012. He roots urban planning firmly in the realm of human rights and draws a distinct ‘line in the sand’ between cities which honor the rights of its citizens and those which have been ‘bought out’ by greater powers.   “The results of […]

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February 11 2014

The Death of Art Deco in Belfast, Ireland

February 11th, 2014Posted by 

Belfast is usually known as a Victorian city, although it is also home to a small selection of beautiful Art Deco buildings. These Art Deco features of the city are at risk as they fall into decay. The large supermarket chain, Tesco, has submitted plans to occupy one such building, except these plans would alter […]

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February 05 2014

Contesting the Renovation of the Historic Poste Centrale in Paris, France

February 5th, 2014Posted by 

Even though the Poste Centrale of Louvre Street is not found within the area usually covered by the “Vivre Le Marais!” blog, the restoration of the largest distribution center for mail in France is important. The project, entrusted to the architect Dominique Perrault in 2012, is rather illustrative of the difficulties that arise between contracting authorities (the Groupe La […]

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February 05 2014

Horrible Historic Preservation in 3 Easy Steps

February 5th, 2014Posted by 

Historic preservation has come a long way from the protesters in front of the old Penn Station in New York, and today it also focuses on issues such as placemaking and the revitalization of neglected buildings and neighborhoods. However, when it is done badly, historic preservation can hinder development and even unintentionally destroy what it […]

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February 03 2014

The Historic Revenge of Workers’ Neighborhoods in Bergerac, Aquitaine, France

February 3rd, 2014Posted by 

Since mid-December 2013, Saint James street has donned some new finery, worthy of the diversity of its architectural heritage. It shows with the new gateway to the historic downtown area, at the exit of the street and the Saint Jacques Church. Good taste is not necessarily unheard of as far as urban development is concerned. […]

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January 28 2014

Belfast Culture Night: A Benefit or a Burden?

January 28th, 2014Posted by 

Every year since 2009, Belfast has hosted Culture Night. Inspired by the success of similar events in other capitals such as Dublin and Copenhagen, Belfast hosts Culture Night every September allowing organisations, groups or individuals to host any cultural event within the Cathedral Quarter. While participation in the event is free, there is obviously a […]

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January 27 2014

Book Review: ‘Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change’

January 27th, 2014Posted by 

Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change is an extended summary of Peter Calthorpe’s thought leadership in the areas of urban planning and its impacts on the surrounding environment. Arguing the holistic nature of planning decisions, Urbanism is full of quotable lines and beautiful graphics demonstrating how our carbon footprint continues to grow despite advances […]

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January 16 2014

A Historical Chinese Industrial Building’s Fate Left to Government Hands

January 16th, 2014Posted by 

As the rate of industrialization and urbanization accelerates in China, more and more factories are becoming deserted. Preserving and developing industrial cultural heritage has become an issue that gathers the public’s attention.  The Zhongyan Hongsifang Joint-Stock Company complex was built in the 1950s in Anhui Province, China. The industrial site had a glorious past, but […]

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