Archive for the ‘History/Preservation’ Category

March 23 2015

Historical Baumanskaya, Moscow Metro Station Closes for Renovations

March 23rd, 2015Posted by 

On February 8, 2015 the Baumanskaya Metro Station, in Moscow, closed for 11 months of renovations. The renovations will include changing its escalators, which were installed with its opening in 1944. They are currently the oldest working tunnel type escalators in the world, as well as the oldest in Moscow, with oak handrails. Renovation of the vestibule and the station are […]

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March 20 2015

Acclaimed Minnesota State Capitol Undergoing $272M Restoration

March 20th, 2015Posted by 

State Capitol Buildings are incredibly important pieces of architecture in the United States of America. Not only do they house a State’s House of Representatives, Senate, and Supreme Court, they also stand as icons to the State in which they reside. The history of each building’s origin and development over their lifetime can be quite fascinating. Here […]

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March 16 2015

San Francisco Adaptive Reuse: From Church to Tech Office

March 16th, 2015Posted by 

When it comes to finding available, unique spaces in San Francisco, tech companies like Twitter, AirBnB, and countless others take on a hermit crab approach. Limited space, dense urban conditions, and nightmarish building regulations make it nearly impossible to build from the ground up. In response, tech companies have resorted to adaptive reuse. Repurposing neglected […]

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March 11 2015

Visionless Phnom Penh, Cambodia: How Will Rapid Development Shape its Future?

March 11th, 2015Posted by 

Phnom Penh, Cambodia has had a tumultuous history that spans architectural ingenuity to human tragedy. It is currently undergoing a rapid phase of urbanization and modernization. As this sleepy city steadily grows, many new structures are changing the face of Cambodia’s capital. There are mounting concerns about how such change could affect the city’s culture, […]

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March 10 2015

Brussels, Belgium Protecting the Architectural Heritage of Antoine Pompe

March 10th, 2015Posted by 

At a time when architectural heritage is under threat around the world, the government of Brussels, Belgium has added Maison Stevens, located at Watermael-Boitsfort, to its historically protected listing and initiated the procedure for listing the Maison Vandevelde at Ganshoren. Both works are by architect Antoine Pompe, the bard of modernism. A Brussels architect who lived an exceptionally long time, Antoine […]

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March 09 2015

“Understanding Architecture:” Experiencing Architecture Through the Senses

March 9th, 2015Posted by 

The book “Understanding Architecture: A Primer on Architecture as Experience,” published in hardcover by Phaidon, covers 72 buildings, internationally, over time. Written and compiled by the American architect Robert McCarter and the Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa, it provides a virtual guide of different building types according to what it would be like to actually walk […]

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March 03 2015

Impact of Paris, France Tourism Worries UNESCO and the World Tourism Organization

March 3rd, 2015Posted by 

Two-thousand-and-fourteen saw the number of tourists traveling the planet break the record of 1.1 trillion, 51 million more than the previous year. It seems that the movement is far from stopping since the trips, often at low cost, grow at an exponential rate. The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), like UNESCO, has sounded the alarm, especially regarding […]

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March 02 2015

The Year of Milan, Italy? Starting the Countdown to Expo 2015

March 2nd, 2015Posted by 

According to internet buzz, Milan is the city of the moment and the place to visit in 2015. In addition to this year’s Fashion Week and Design Week, Milan will also be the host of one of the largest world fairs held since 1800: Expo 2015. One hundred and seventy-five countries are set to take part in this international fair, with 7,000 different […]

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February 23 2015

Is Momentum Building for Daylighting Park River in Hartford, Connecticut?

February 23rd, 2015Posted by 

The Park River in Hartford, Connecticut meanders through the city, but you might never know it. Once a historically valuable and nostalgic part of Hartford (at least to Mark Twain, who lived along it), it now flows through two conduits channeled under city’s downtown. While neither the river nor the conduits are visible from the […]

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February 20 2015

Benin, Africa Architect Roméo Mivekannin: “Architecture is a Powerful Political Act”

February 20th, 2015Posted by 

Roméo Mivekannin is a young Beninese architect from Cotonou, Africa, where his family still lives. He has just finished his studies at the Distinguished National School of Architecture in Toulouse (ENSA). As a student, he followed an unusual path of study. This, coupled with his fierce desire to succeed, helped him to make his longtime […]

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February 19 2015

What Does the 2016 Formation of “Grand Paris” Mean for Arrondissements?

February 19th, 2015Posted by 

Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015, an informational meeting about Grand Paris took place in the City Hall of the 4th arrondissement. I was very happy to take part in it because it was very interesting. On this point, I must express my regret that information about the fact that this meeting was being held was not […]

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February 13 2015

Minneapolis, Minnesota’s Inclusion of Sculptural Art Activates its Public Spaces

February 13th, 2015Posted by 

Minneapolis, Minnesota is considered a city with a strong passion for art, with many theaters and art museums scattered throughout the urban fabric of the community. One big giveaway of the metro area’s devotion to the art culture is the way that sculptural pieces are incorporated throughout the public spaces of the city, including areas […]

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February 10 2015

Controversy Surrounds Paris, France’s Marais & Tourist Coach Parking

February 10th, 2015Posted by 

We have said it many times to the elected officials, the police, and in particular to Pierre Aidenbaum, the Mayor of the 3rd arrondissement, and to the Central Deputy Commissioner Cyril Lacombe, the Marais must never, under any circumstance, despite its numerous museums, become a parking lot for tourism coaches and school buses. Indeed, two […]

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February 09 2015

Farewell to The Grid from Molly Carpenter in Des Moines, Iowa

February 9th, 2015Posted by 

After six months of blogging, it is time for me to say goodbye to The Grid. This comes as I also say goodbye to Iowa, the state I called home for three and a half years. While studying urban planning at Iowa State University, I rarely ventured far from town, not thinking there was anything […]

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February 09 2015

Two Historic Mill-Worker Housing Developments in Brooklyn, Connecticut

February 9th, 2015Posted by 

Over the course of the 1800′s, Louis Comfort Tiffany and Amos Lockwood built a series of mills in East Brooklyn, Connecticut’s “Quebec Square” neighborhood. Today, little is left of these mills; much of the complex (1952 Aerial) burnt down in 1961, but some of their structures remain. Their conditions range from habitable, to condemned, all […]

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February 02 2015

Mumbai, India to Receive Water from Potentially Disastrous River Inter-Linking Project

February 2nd, 2015Posted by 

Some of the largest cities in India, including Mumbai, are now slated to receive water from a very controversial river inter-linking project. Slated at $130 billion, the mega-project aims to divert portions of India’s largest rivers, such as the Yamuna, to arid areas in the country. The project was suspended more than two decades ago […]

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January 30 2015

St. Henri: Another Montreal Working Class Neighbourhood Gradually Transforming

January 30th, 2015Posted by 

Has St. Henri been subject to a renewal or gentrification? The latter has become a sensitive topic in urban planning theory, and is the cause of many debates and discussions. Notable for its negative implication of wealthy outsiders displacing poorer residents, the shift in demographics leads to subsequent changes to a neighbourhood’s social and economic […]

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January 29 2015

Futuristic Greenwashed Highrises Undermine Paris Smart City 2050′s Vision

January 29th, 2015Posted by 

The illustrated study has been making the rounds on the internet for several days: “Paris Smart City 2050, or a futurist vision of the capital proposed by Belgian architect Vincent Callebaut and the SETEC building office of engineers?” Last spring, the team responded to a call for entries by the Urban Ecology Agency of the […]

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January 28 2015

Sustainable Architecture Booming in Rural Phnom Penh, Cambodia: Why Not Urban?

January 28th, 2015Posted by 

Phnom Penh is a very green city; the streets are lined with trees, and vegetation grows endlessly in the tropical climate. Cambodia also has a rich history of architectural design, and despite immense deforestation, it has many natural building and sustainable construction resources. Unfortunately, the latter trend can also be said about the recent construction […]

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January 27 2015

A Proposal to Save the City of Montreal, Canada From Economic Ruin

January 27th, 2015Posted by 

Since the 1950s, Montreal has seen itself dispossessed of its title as Canada’s metropolis through a series of Canadian political, provincial and, yes, Montreal, decisions. To this effect, we can cite the Saint Lawrence Seaway, which diminished the role of ferrying in the Port of Montreal and its economic contribution; and the Mirabel Airport, which […]

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