Archive for the ‘History/Preservation’ Category

May 12 2015

ArchiTerre Festival 2015 in Adrar, Algeria Supports Ancestral Construction Techniques

May 12th, 2015Posted by 

One idea that is much discussed at the Information/Awareness Days for the 4th international ArchiTerre festival is the use of local materials in future construction projects. The festival, which promotes earthen architecture, took place at Ahmed Draia University in Adrar, Algeria. According to Abdelhamid Benouali from the National Center for Integrated Construction Research and Studies (CNERIB), […]

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May 11 2015

University of Minnesota – Twin Cities Campus Cherishes its Architectural Roots

May 11th, 2015Posted by 

Many universities in the United States work hard to preserve their campuses’ historic architecture. In fact, many schools cherish their old buildings so much that it even plays a part in their recruitment programs. The University of Minnesota – Twin Cities in Minneapolis, Minnesota is no exception, boasting some of the finest and historic academic buildings […]

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May 07 2015

The Most Beautiful Boulevard: Austria, Vienna Celebrates Ringstrasse’s 150th Birthday

May 7th, 2015Posted by 

With its resplendent marble museums, austere Habsburg palaces, and the soaring spires of government offices more beautiful than most cathedrals, Austria’s capital city is breathtaking. Visitors to central Vienna are often left enchanted by the Ringstrasse, the historic ring road encircling the city’s innermost district. But the five kilometre long promenade, which recently celebrated its 150th […]

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May 01 2015

Street Artists Destroying Their Work: The Fate of Street Art in Kitchener, Canada

May 1st, 2015Posted by 

Street art and graffiti started as a movement of the oppressed that sought to spread political messages or reclaim space. However, as the art form has gained currency with young money, there is a growing trend of marketers trying to use street art to sell their products. Just like authentic mom and pop Mexican food […]

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April 30 2015

Thủ Thiêm Wetland of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam to Become Central Business District

April 30th, 2015Posted by 

How big is Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam? Any newcomer to this sprawling conurbation would be forgiven for thinking it infinite, especially if they find themselves in the labyrinthine, haphazard sprawl of its periphery. In reality of course, the city (known to most locals by its historical name, Saigon) has its limits, even if those […]

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April 30 2015

The California Environmental Quality Act’s Effect on Development in Los Angeles

April 30th, 2015Posted by 

The California Environmental Quality Act, commonly referred to as CEQA, is a state law that requires all agencies to identify and mitigate significant environmental impacts caused by their proposed projects. Ronald Reagan enacted CEQA back in 1970, when he was the Governor of California. Undoubtedly, the creation of CEQA goes hand in hand with the […]

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April 27 2015

Minneapolis, Minnesota’s Historic Stone Arch Bridge Offers a Story of Revitalization

April 27th, 2015Posted by 

The historic Stone Arch Bridge spans 2,100 feet across the width of the Mississippi River and connects the East Bank near the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities campus to downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. Completed as a railway bridge in 1883, this structure has remained an iconic beacon of Minneapolis for over a century. It is now a […]

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April 16 2015

Montreal, Quebec’s Théâtre de Verdure Closed for Second Season Due to Disrepair

April 16th, 2015Posted by 

Once upon a time, there was a treasure located in the heart of one of the most beautiful parks in Montreal, Canada. A treasure with an uncertain future. This jewel is the Théâtre de Verdure. This open air stage can accommodate 3,000 spectators in an oasis nested very close to the La Fontaine Park pond […]

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April 15 2015

Old Site of Grocer’s Market Continues Transformation in La Confluence, Lyon, France

April 15th, 2015Posted by 

The district of La Confluence, Lyon, France continues its transformation east of the Cours Charlemagne. The developer, Icade, invested in the land historically occupied by the grocer’s market, and a team of six designers redesigned it in order to give life to Ynfluences Square: a multifunctional real estate program. Ynfluences Square faces the hotel of the […]

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April 14 2015

Exhibition: Activism and Transgression at Paris, France’s Cité de l’Architecture

April 14th, 2015Posted by 

The exhibit “A Building, How Many Lives?” on view from Dec. 17, 2014 to Sept. 28, 2015 at the Palais de Chaillot in Paris, France, is based on an exercise of compilation that gives its meaning to the name of the place – “Architecture and Heritage” – however exasperating it may be. Beyond that, it is […]

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April 13 2015

Expo’s Gate is Full of Programs But Architecture Fails to Impress Milan

April 13th, 2015Posted by 

“Expo Gate: Milan’s Gateway to the Expo” is the slogan you can find on the Expo 2015 webpage describing the exhibition’s entryway. The structure is located in Via Beltrami, in the city center of Milan, in front of the Castello Sforzesco. It connects the castle, which was the epicenter of the 1906 Universal Exhibition, and […]

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April 13 2015

University of Connecticut’s Depot Campus: UConn’s Future Gateway

April 13th, 2015Posted by 

A correctional facility, a mental institution, and a school for the mentally challenged. Sounds like college, right? Surprisingly enough, buildings on the University of Connecticut’s Depot Campus used to be home to these very programs. The University’s acquisition of properties evolved with their closure over the later half of the 1900’s. The former correctional facility on […]

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April 09 2015

The Blossoming Murals Circuit of Sherbrooke, Quebec’s East District

April 9th, 2015Posted by 

The gigantic murals that have characterized Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada’s city center since 2002 are now taking over the city’s eastern side. Between now and the end of April 2015, ten works will be mounted on buildings on Rue King Est, between Bowen and 18th Avenue, in order to create the East Murals circuit. These murals […]

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March 31 2015

Brutalist Communism Memorial Sited Across from Supreme Court in Ottawa, Canada

March 31st, 2015Posted by 

Fighting against destructions. Protesting against constructions. To believe that only the status quo is the savior. In Ottawa, the memorial to the victims of Communism has attracted the criticism of the profession. Canada’s Royal Architectural Institute has expressed itself as not in favor of the project by Abstrakt Studio. Who would have thought? Since the […]

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March 30 2015

Plainfield, Connecticut’s Inter Royal Mill is the Perfect Town Playground Extension?

March 30th, 2015Posted by 

Every town has them: warehouses, mills, and factories of some bygone industrial heyday. Years of abandonment has deteriorated their structures. Often, they are “contaminated.” Some have been met by fire. Overgrown and fenced-off, “keep out” signs keep us protected from them. The cost of remediating these properties far exceeds the reach of most local and […]

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March 23 2015

Historical Baumanskaya, Moscow Metro Station Closes for Renovations

March 23rd, 2015Posted by 

On February 8, 2015 the Baumanskaya Metro Station, in Moscow, closed for 11 months of renovations. The renovations will include changing its escalators, which were installed with its opening in 1944. They are currently the oldest working tunnel type escalators in the world, as well as the oldest in Moscow, with oak handrails. Renovation of the vestibule and the station are […]

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March 20 2015

Acclaimed Minnesota State Capitol Undergoing $272M Restoration

March 20th, 2015Posted by 

State Capitol Buildings are incredibly important pieces of architecture in the United States of America. Not only do they house a State’s House of Representatives, Senate, and Supreme Court, they also stand as icons to the State in which they reside. The history of each building’s origin and development over their lifetime can be quite fascinating. Here […]

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March 16 2015

San Francisco Adaptive Reuse: From Church to Tech Office

March 16th, 2015Posted by 

When it comes to finding available, unique spaces in San Francisco, tech companies like Twitter, AirBnB, and countless others take on a hermit crab approach. Limited space, dense urban conditions, and nightmarish building regulations make it nearly impossible to build from the ground up. In response, tech companies have resorted to adaptive reuse. Repurposing neglected […]

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March 11 2015

Visionless Phnom Penh, Cambodia: How Will Rapid Development Shape its Future?

March 11th, 2015Posted by 

Phnom Penh, Cambodia has had a tumultuous history that spans architectural ingenuity to human tragedy. It is currently undergoing a rapid phase of urbanization and modernization. As this sleepy city steadily grows, many new structures are changing the face of Cambodia’s capital. There are mounting concerns about how such change could affect the city’s culture, […]

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March 10 2015

Brussels, Belgium Protecting the Architectural Heritage of Antoine Pompe

March 10th, 2015Posted by 

At a time when architectural heritage is under threat around the world, the government of Brussels, Belgium has added Maison Stevens, located at Watermael-Boitsfort, to its historically protected listing and initiated the procedure for listing the Maison Vandevelde at Ganshoren. Both works are by architect Antoine Pompe, the bard of modernism. A Brussels architect who lived an exceptionally long time, Antoine […]

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