Archive for the ‘History/Preservation’ Category

February 09 2015

Farewell to The Grid from Molly Carpenter in Des Moines, Iowa

February 9th, 2015Posted by 

After six months of blogging, it is time for me to say goodbye to The Grid. This comes as I also say goodbye to Iowa, the state I called home for three and a half years. While studying urban planning at Iowa State University, I rarely ventured far from town, not thinking there was anything […]

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February 09 2015

Two Historic Mill-Worker Housing Developments in Brooklyn, Connecticut

February 9th, 2015Posted by 

Over the course of the 1800′s, Louis Comfort Tiffany and Amos Lockwood built a series of mills in East Brooklyn, Connecticut’s “Quebec Square” neighborhood. Today, little is left of these mills; much of the complex (1952 Aerial) burnt down in 1961, but some of their structures remain. Their conditions range from habitable, to condemned, all […]

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January 30 2015

St. Henri: Another Montreal Working Class Neighbourhood Gradually Transforming

January 30th, 2015Posted by 

Has St. Henri been subject to a renewal or gentrification? The latter has become a sensitive topic in urban planning theory, and is the cause of many debates and discussions. Notable for its negative implication of wealthy outsiders displacing poorer residents, the shift in demographics leads to subsequent changes to a neighbourhood’s social and economic […]

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January 26 2015

New Statewide Rideshare Program Responds to Iowa’s Transportation Demand

January 26th, 2015Posted by 

If an Iowan were to complain about traffic conditions in Des Moines to someone from out of state, they would likely be laughed at. Traffic in the metropolitan area of Des Moines is nothing compared to that in cities such as Chicago or Los Angeles. However, there is a bigger commuting issue that plagues the state. […]

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January 26 2015

Longest Footbridge East of the Mississippi: Century-Old Willimantic Footbridge

January 26th, 2015Posted by 

While Willimantic’s Frog Bridge might be eastern Connecticut’s most familiar bridge, there is a far more historically notable bridge close by that has provided access to Willimantic’s downtown for over a century: the Willimantic Footbridge. As the Willimantic textile industry grew in the 1800’s, so did it’s neighborhoods on the south side of the town’s namesake river. […]

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January 20 2015

Are Eco-Towers Coming to Downtown Paris, France?

January 20th, 2015Posted by 

An engineering and architecture firm have been working on Paris’ Climate/Energy Plan, to be achieved by 2050. Their work led to plans for large, positive energy apartment buildings. How can we invent the city of the future while considering the constraints, necessities, and aspirations of its inhabitants, administrations, and enterprises? This, especially given that we live in a […]

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January 12 2015

Why are Milliennials Flocking to Des Moines, Iowa?

January 12th, 2015Posted by 

On its surface, the city of Des Moines may not seem like the most attractive place in which to settle down. It’s located in the middle of the state, surrounded in all directions by a buffer of cornfields. The city has also come to be known as a major center of the US insurance industry. […]

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January 12 2015

Placemaking Opportunities from The Los Angeles River’s Revitalization

January 12th, 2015Posted by 

In response to a pair of deadly floods in the late 1930’s, the US Army Corps of Engineers were called in to control the Los Angeles River. In doing so, most of the river was encased in concrete – it wasn’t until roughly 50 years later that action was taken to revitalize the river. Presently, […]

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January 08 2015

A Tale of Two Cities: Turin and Milan, Italy’s Agenda for Urban Innovation

January 8th, 2015Posted by 

Urban innovation is a term that has swept several major Italian cities, among others around the world. The term refers to a city’s ability to reinvent itself by proposing a framework of new projects. The concept has come to dominate all strategic planning in places that need to reevaluate their functionality and promote their image. […]

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January 06 2015

Holistic Architect, Lutgarde Brun, to Lead Huy, Belgium’s Urban Planning Services

January 6th, 2015Posted by 

Lutgarde Brun is the new city architect in Huy, Belgium. Numerous challenges, many of them quite large, await her, but she is prepared and excited to tackle them head on. With 2,000 new inhabitants expected in Huy over the course of the next ten years (and 1,000 new lodgings that will come with them), the […]

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January 05 2015

Galway, Ireland Turns to its Community in Struggle Against Sprawl

January 5th, 2015Posted by 

As long as cities have existed there has been urban sprawl. In Galway, Ireland a dramatic increase in the city’s urban sprawl began in the 19th century, when labourers flocked from the countryside to work in the new factories that were then springing up. Large developments of small terraced houses began to appear, and new […]

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January 02 2015

Iowa Urbanizes as Large Farm Operations Put Small Towns Out of Work

January 2nd, 2015Posted by 

Iowa is the U.S. state most associated with farming; it produces more corn and soybean than any other state, and 92% of the land is designated for agriculture. As farming practices change, the urban landscape changes with it. The population of Iowa has been experiencing a transformation. Whereas Iowa used to be composed of evenly-dispersed […]

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December 30 2014

New Housing to Replace Former Hospital in Annecy, France

December 30th, 2014Posted by 

On November 28, 2014, renovation became legal on the site of the future Trésums neighborhood in Annecy, France. This decision came through from the State Council after a long judicial saga. On the site, asbestos removal is currently taking place, and the deconstruction of the former hospital will soon follow. All of this will leave room […]

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December 29 2014

The Demolition of Iconic Negro Community Center in Montreal’s Little Burgundy

December 29th, 2014Posted by 

Like many other neighbourhoods in the City of Montreal, Little Burgundy is slowly changing. Cafes and cool bars have emerged on Rue Notre-Dame, a street previously known for its abundance of antique shops. The Corona Theatre, built in 1912, has been revived as a hip and intimate concert venue. The art-deco styled Atwater Market remains […]

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December 29 2014

More than Half of the World’s Zoroastrians Call Mumbai, India Home

December 29th, 2014Posted by 

We have all heard about the famous Persians Xerxes, Cyrus and Darius the Great. They were recorded by ancient Greek historians, and were even referenced heavily in the Bible. But whatever happened to their descendants? The short answer is they moved to Mumbai. Mumbai (or Bombay) in India is home to the largest Zoroastrian community in […]

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December 26 2014

Moissy-Cramayel, France’s Citizens Petition the Deteriorated State of their Downtown

December 26th, 2014Posted by 

A petition was launched in November 2014 by the citizens and business owners of Moissy-Cramayel, France. By and large, they note the lack of security and upkeep in the center of town. The Mayor, Line Magne, promises changes but asks for time. The title of the petition, addressed to the mayor, was “No to A Dirty and Unsafe […]

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December 23 2014

Tiny & Historical “Shoebox” Houses Face Development Pressure in Montreal

December 23rd, 2014Posted by 

“Shoe boxes,” the little houses that have survived the passage of time in Montreal, tend to attract attention. In the urban landscape, they seem out of place. In order to better get to know the history of these little houses, we met with three of their owners. They were all chosen by chance during a […]

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December 22 2014

Improving Upon the Unfinished Quinebaug River Trail in Danielson, Connecticut

December 22nd, 2014Posted by 

The Quinebaug River Trail* in the Danielson borough of Killingly, Connecticut is a well-maintained, 9ft. wide asphalt bike path that mostly parallels the Quinebaug River. It extends southward for approximately five miles, all the way to the Plainfield town line. From a certain standpoint, the path is a complete and a total success. While town planners might […]

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December 19 2014

“The Gathering” Results in Remarkable Population Increase for Galway, Ireland

December 19th, 2014Posted by 

Situated on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean overlooking Galway Bay and the majestically beautiful Burren National Park, Galway, Ireland has always been one of the most popular tourist destinations in Ireland. However, in recent decades Galway has also become a popular location to live and work year-round. The population of the city has expanded 58.5% […]

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December 19 2014

Why Some Mumbai, India Slum Dwellers Prefer Slums to Condos

December 19th, 2014Posted by 

Slum Dog Millionaire, a fictional movie about a boy from Mumbai’s slums who miraculously makes it big on India’s version of “Who Wants to be a Millionaire,” was revered by Western critics and reviled by most Indian viewers. Why the divide? To get to the heart of it, I realized actually going to Mumbai (India) seemed […]

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