Archive for the ‘Engineering’ Category

July 10 2014

Communities in the Amazon Use Solar Power to Watch the World Cup

July 10th, 2014Posted by 

Isolated communities in the interior of the Amazon are now able to watch the games of the World Cup, especially to support the Brazilian team, which is something that was unthinkable for decades. The community of the Sobrado in the city of New Airão, is an example. Villagers were fortunate enough to watch the opening […]

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July 04 2014

San Francisco’s High-Tech Urbanism

July 4th, 2014Posted by 

Everyday we see how technology is changing the way we live and work, but how is it affecting our built environment? San Francisco is one of the major test grounds for new ideas and technological innovation and it is here that our interaction with the physical world is also evolving. New ways to interact, communicate […]

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July 03 2014

Building for Intellectual Growth in Madison: Wisconsin’s Future Idea Center

July 3rd, 2014Posted by 

The “Wisconsin Idea” is a principle that is ingrained in every young mind that enters the University of Wisconsin. The basis of the Wisconsin Idea is that the university should improve people’s lives beyond the classroom. This can range from public service and volunteer work to teaching and research. In 2010, a group of design […]

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July 03 2014

Red Line Light Rail Plans Spark Needed Discussion Across Baltimore

July 3rd, 2014Posted by 

The City of Baltimore has a lot of problems, just some of which officials hope to solve with fourteen miles of new light rail. The new Red Line project will be the city’s second light rail line, this time connecting the long-neglected southwest Baltimore to the downtown area and through to southeastern neighborhoods. The hope […]

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July 01 2014

Three Querns Preserved & Operating Again on Patmos Island, Greece

July 1st, 2014Posted by 

In places with few residents, nicknames are extremely common. Patmos’ citizens tenderly call the architect Dafni Becket “Mylomama” (meaning the mother of querns). The reason for this nickname is because this Greek woman, who was a child of diaspora (from a mother who comes from Athens and an American dad, she grew up in Geneva) […]

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June 25 2014

Wisconsin’s Own Copenhagen? Madison’s Blossoming Bicycle Infrastructure

June 25th, 2014Posted by 

Though Madison, Wisconsin is covered in a deep layer of ice and snow for almost half of the year, it doesn’t stop many of the city’s hardiest bicyclists. No matter if it’s a beautiful June afternoon or a bitterly cold March day, you will always find a dedicated crew of commuters traversing the city’s vast […]

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June 20 2014

Persons with Disabilities Largely Ignored in African Cities

June 20th, 2014Posted by 

Recent up-market building construction in the City of Nairobi has made a big effort to accommodate persons with disability, the sick and the elderly. Ramps for those who may have a problem using stairs, braille buttons, vocal instructions in lifts for the visually impaired, and even special washrooms for these vulnerable groups are some of […]

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June 19 2014

Temporality, Energy Consumption & Lessons From Lighting in Lyon, France

June 19th, 2014Posted by 

“Temporality Is Essential to Mastering Energy Consumption,” Antoine Bouchet, former director of urban lighting for the City of Lyon from 2003 to 2012. Memories from four decades of light. At the end of March 2014, I had the pleasure of interviewing Antoine Bouchet. This great professional leaves us “a non-exhaustive approach to lighting the City […]

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June 18 2014

A New Beginning for the Parc du Vallon in Lyon, Rhônes-Alpes, France

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

Situated in the heart of the Duchère neighborhood in the 9th arrondissement of Lyon, the Parc du Vallon reopened its doors on the week of June 6th after three years of work. A vast green space of 11 hectares, it is an area conducive to relaxation, while also absorbing the site’s topography and preserving the […]

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June 18 2014

The Bay Bridge Deconstruction: Can Demolition Be Sustainable?

June 18th, 2014Posted by 

San Francisco’s Bay Bridge, which has served as a work-horse for the bay area since 1936, is undergoing demolition to make way for a more contemporary counterpart. The new bridge is already becoming a world icon claiming its spot as one of the most seismically advanced structures in the world. It is the world’s longest and […]

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June 17 2014

Train Stations: Matrices of the 19th Century Parisian Imagination

June 17th, 2014Posted by 

From 1837 to 1914, railway stations covered Paris; they were a new kind of space, half-industrial and half-urban. This transplant profoundly transformed the landscape, but also the nature of the city, its functions and its place in the national and international arena. Under the Second Empire, the city was reconfigured around these new, modern “gates,” […]

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June 06 2014

Is There Any Solution to Nairobi’s Parking Nightmare?

June 6th, 2014Posted by 

“Drivers in New Delhi, Bangalore, Nairobi and Milan argue most over parking spaces [and] more than half of the drivers get frustrated and end up giving up on looking for parking space,” according to IBMs global survey on parking space in major cities. Many have stated that Nairobi, in particular the Central Business District, does not […]

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June 03 2014

Billboards that Literally Breath & Create Potable Water in Lima, Peru

June 3rd, 2014Posted by 

I have to confess that I am impressed by the social engagement of the future engineers from UTEC (University of Engineering and Technology), who have continuously been innovating to improve the quality of life (which is often mediocre) of the residents of their home country of Peru. Last year, the group drew the attention of […]

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June 03 2014

From Grey to Green: or, How to Make Green Roofs Legal in Buenos Aires

June 3rd, 2014Posted by 

Recently, many things have changed in Buenos Aires concerning environmental awareness and policies towards more responsible urban planning - ones that are in tune with the rest of the world. As mentioned in previous posts, the government of the city is making huge changes in waste management, sustainable transportation and promoting an overall “green” mentality. However, until not […]

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May 29 2014

Lights 2.0 on Stratumseind, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

May 29th, 2014Posted by 

In the “smart cities” of the future, lighting will play an important role. In December 2013, the city of Eindhoven kickstarted a very interesting future project for a “smart city” for the long term. The project aims to model the ambiance of one of the hotspots of popular entertainment in Europe, Stratumseind. It combines a […]

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May 28 2014

Connecting Buildings – Separating Social Classes: The Vasari Corridor in Florence

May 28th, 2014Posted by 

It may not be the most famous attraction in Florence, but it surely is the most intriguing one. The Vasari Corridor, an indoor passageway that defines the skyline of the Florentine center, has a total length of almost two kilometres and a rather interesting history.  Designed in the year 1564 by the architect and art […]

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May 28 2014

Another Unreasonable Project: The Golden Horn Tunnel

May 28th, 2014Posted by 

A sub-sea tunnel is being planned to replace Unkapani Bridge as part of a project very much like that which occurred in Taksim to move streets underground. I sincerely wonder who proposed this “genius” project. I guess the contractors are at work again. The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, who was reckless enough to build an unnecessary horned bridge by the […]

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May 23 2014

The Emerging Motorcycle Taxi Sector of Nairobi, Kenya

May 23rd, 2014Posted by 

When we think of mobility as a public good, we need to ensure that people can access different parts of the city in a flexible manner. There are several means that can be used for this from bicycles and cars to walking and public transportation. The phenomenon of motorcycle taxis has become popular around the world recently. However, many urban planners, authorities […]

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May 16 2014

The Lost Tramway of Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro

May 16th, 2014Posted by 

The winding cobblestone streets of Rio de Janeiro’s most bohemian neighbourhood of Santa Teresa are aligned with historic colonial homes, intimate cafes and bars, funky restaurants, and quaint artisanal shops. A hilltop district, it offers sweeping views of both the city center and the Sugarloaf Mountain. Adding to the neighbourhood’s charm was a yellow tram, […]

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May 15 2014

Architects and the War: “Architecture in Uniform. Planning and Constructing for WWII” in Paris

May 15th, 2014Posted by 

What were architects working on during WWII, and how did this affect the history of their discipline? Returning to this question, the current exhibition at the Cite de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine shows both how this period inscribed itself in the long history of architecture and how it brought on consequences for the twentieth century. […]

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