Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

March 20 2014

Bio-Retention Breakthroughs in Kansas City, Missouri

March 20th, 2014Posted by 

The City of Kansas City, Missouri is planning to move on the Arrowhead Transmission Main project in the future to address storm-water management and related issues in the city. This entails attempting to increase system capacity, improve overall system reliability, provide redundancy to existing thirty-six-inch MCI transmission main, and to accommodate regional Northland community growth. […]

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March 19 2014

The Creation of the Italian Commune: Architecture as a Tool of Politics

March 19th, 2014Posted by 

Out of the darkness of the Middle-Ages, helped by the extreme economic power of commerce, and taking advantage of the turbulence caused by the constant fight for control between the church and the Holy Roman Empire, there emerged in Italy an urban form forgotten since Antiquity: the city-state. These states, also known as Communes, gained […]

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March 18 2014

Exploring the City: The Old Slaughterhouse of Thessaloniki, Greece

March 18th, 2014Posted by 

On February 17, 1896 was the year the first Olympic Games took place in Athens. After several long meetings, Thessaloniki’s city council decided to launch certain public projects for the improvement of the city’s infrastructure. Among them, the council proposed the demolition of the old slaughterhouse and the construction of a new one. That same year, […]

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March 18 2014

The Reasoning Behind the Washington, D.C. Height Act

March 18th, 2014Posted by 

There is a piece of local lore circulating around Washington, D.C., attempting to explain why the city is so short. The myth claims that developers have been prevented from building up because it is inscribed somewhere that the Washington Monument and US Capitol must be the tallest structures in the city. However, the real reasoning […]

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March 14 2014

Madison’s Edgewater Hotel Redevelopment Nearing Completion

March 14th, 2014Posted by 

Madison’s downtown is located on an isthmus and, therefore, has a plethora of lakefront access and housing. The two lakes provide a venue for boaters, water-skiers, ice skaters, and fishermen, and they attract day-trippers from all over southern Wisconsin. Arguably, the most historic lakefront street is Langdon Street - only a few blocks from the state capitol […]

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March 14 2014

Revitalizing Dublin’s “Georgian Mile:” Controversy Surrounds ESB Headquarters

March 14th, 2014Posted by 

In 1965, despite significant protests, sixteen Georgian buildings were demolished in central Dublin to make way for the new Electricity Supply Board (ESB) Headquarters. The houses were part of the world’s longest Georgian streetscape, commonly known as Dublin’s Georgian Mile. Today, in place of the Georgian buildings, now stands an imposing brutalist office block by […]

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March 14 2014

“Hatches, Matches, and Dispatches” Building of Kenya Continues to Stand

March 14th, 2014Posted by 

A city may start as a few shops, a road junction or even a railway station. The City of Nairobi is no exception. Starting as a railway headquarters in a swampy area, it has grown to a huge cosmopolitan concrete jungle. The historical growth and initial urban design of the city can be appreciated through […]

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March 13 2014

Exploring the City: Palais Ermeion in Thessaloniki, Greece

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

At Venizeloy Street 23, between Ermou and Egnatia Street, one can find Palais Ermeion. This edifice, which demonstrates the glory of eclectic architecture, was built in the 1920s and designed by the architects S. Milonas and A. Georgakopoulos. The most impressive part of the building is the arresting gate that leads to a lodge, named […]

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March 13 2014

Tearing it Down: Melbourne at Odds with British Architectural History

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

Melbourne has an iconic history, which is only 200 somewhat years old. Having a British lineage means that most of the buildings created in the gold rush days resemble European ideals that today may seem a little dated for the modern Australian. That being said, the city of Melbourne takes heritage preservation very seriously and […]

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March 13 2014

Former Factories Receive a Second Life in Waterloo, Ontario

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

When we think of old buildings, images of dilapidated, abandoned structures come to mind. Often, for the sake of progress, old buildings are demolished, and a part of the city’s history turns to dust. However, in the city of Waterloo, Ontario, some old buildings are given a new lease of life through the practice of […]

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March 13 2014

What the Seahawk’s Super Bowl Victory Did for Historic Preservation in Seattle

March 13th, 2014Posted by 

It is not our reputation here in Seattle to get too wild. But after the Seahawks dominated in our first Super Bowl this year, we had to take the streets. While I watched from below, dozens climbed and rallied on top of the century-old Pergola (pictured below), breaking panes of its fragile glass. But fans […]

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March 12 2014

La Poste du Louvre: A Building in Paris, France that Demands Special Classification

March 12th, 2014Posted by 

La Poste du Louvre’s austere façades are emblematic of an architectural rationalism unique to France. Julien Guadet, student of the famed Henri Labrouste, designed the building. As a studio director at École des Beaux-Arts for more than thirty years, Guadet was the author of Elements and Theory of Architecture which served as a bible for […]

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March 11 2014

The Uncertain Future of a Landmark Victorian Building in Belfast, Ireland

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

It’s historical preservation week at The Grid and in Belfast, a landmark Victorian building is facing an uncertain future. In the city centre, the former Swanston’s Linen Warehouse has recently been denied demolition after the third bid to tear the warehouse down. The future of the building had been the subject of a legal row […]

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March 11 2014

The Rebirth of Ziller’s Omonoia Square: Athens, Greece

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

Two old hotels, Bagion and Megas Alexandros, and the café Neon stand observing, like always, the prewar neoclassical square Omonoia. These are the only buildings that keep the memory of the old square alive and moreover seem to have many things in common. All three of them were built in the same period, at the end of […]

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March 11 2014

Is the Work of Colombian Architect Rogelio Salmona Destined to Ruins?

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

Rogelio Salmona is recognized as one of the most important architects of Latin America. For over fifty years, his works and thoughts guided the formation of hundreds of architects who find in them an expression that is both in tune with contemporary trends and traditional sensibilities, with the cultural characteristics of the place in which […]

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March 11 2014

Nairobi Old Estates: A Glance at the Ofafa Jericho Eastlands

March 11th, 2014Posted by 

The City of Nairobi owes its development to the Kenya to Uganda Railway project, initiated by the colonialists in 1896. The railway ran from the coastal town of Mombasa to Kenya’s neighbor country Uganda. The town was then demarcated around 1905 through racial segregation and land was designated to different races; the Europeans, Indians, and […]

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March 10 2014

A New Urban Park for Foch Avenue in Paris, France?

March 10th, 2014Posted by 

The designers for a proposed development on Foch Avenue, the Constructions et Développements urbains (CDU) company and the architectural firm Hamonic, Masson, and Associates, summarized the birth of their project with the following words: “Everything started with a gut-feeling. While smoking a cigarette outside of a restaurant in Paris’ 16th arrondissement during a summer night […]

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March 07 2014

A Significant Problem: Lack of Public Libraries in Istanbul

March 7th, 2014Posted by 

In an age with the digitalization of libraries, one still looks for a cozy place to wonder around the shelves of millions of different stories. When was the last time a hand from the fifteenth century grasped onto your shoulder in the dead of silence? Or when was it last that you spaced out within […]

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March 05 2014

Sustainable Development: 100% Self-sufficient Buildings in Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France

March 5th, 2014Posted by 

After having covered some rather outrageous projects in this blog, let’s focus on a more realistic undertaking. The project in question is a partnership for research and development that was signed in January by Bouygues Construction and the city of Grenoble ordering the construction of a block of multi-unit apartment buildings. This experimental project, set […]

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March 05 2014

The Duomo of Florence: A Symbol of Arrogance, an Eternal Landmark

March 5th, 2014Posted by 

In a city full of world-renowned architectural monuments, the Florence cathedral Santa Maria del Fiore, with its glorious dome, is still the most immediately recognizable element of the city. Looking to the size of the Duomo, one cannot help but think it’s even too big for the scale of the narrowed-street medieval city. Thus, it […]

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