Archive for the ‘Christine Cepelak’ Category

July 23 2014

Hacking the City: “Explore Everything” Book Review

July 23rd, 2014Posted by 

There is a feeling among many people that the city is built for others, that we may look at it but may not touch it, the spatial equivalent of an artifact in a glass case in a museum. (162) Explore Everything documents the adventures of Bradley Garrett, an urban explorer and researcher at the University […]

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July 21 2014

Farewell to The Grid from Christine Cepelak in Dallas, Texas

July 21st, 2014Posted by 

If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write. – Martin Luther King, Jr. Already active in the sustainability, urban development, and poverty realms of Dallas, Texas, I consistently encountered inspiring people engaged in the complex issues of the greater metropolis. From my original interest in how poverty and marginalization could be […]

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June 27 2014

Cycle or Psycho Paths: Ft. Worth, Texas’ New Bike Share

June 27th, 2014Posted by 

Is there room for a bike share in a largely car-dependent area? With the exception of a few dense areas, North Texas is notorious for its sprawl and car-dependency. Despite Dallas activists working to tear down a highway to create greater walkability and the city’s recent approval of connective bike lanes, the culture of people-centered mobility continues to grow […]

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June 20 2014

LEED in Dallas, Texas Focuses on Buildings, Lacks Neighborhood Sustainability

June 20th, 2014Posted by 

Can urbanism separate itself from the imperative of climate change? In North Texas, walkable areas become oases of activity in the expanse of suburban development. Areas such as The Shops at Legacy in Plano, and the Uptown area inside Dallas city limits, are examples of popular high-density mixed use development. While these areas conserve land […]

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May 26 2014

Dallas, Texas’ Great Trinity Forest

May 26th, 2014Posted by 

Dallas’ hybrid reputation of urban cowboy-ism has its roots reinforced by preserved open prairie land, south of its downtown area limits. Home to the Trinity River and largest urban hardwood forest in the United States, the Great Trinity Forest, the ten thousand acres of protected space represent a recent transformation which honors the expansive history […]

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May 16 2014

Can a Suburb be Great?: Plano, Texas Receives “Best Managed” City to Live Award

May 16th, 2014Posted by 

When contemplating the “city,” one often imagines the iconic megalopolis of their respective culture – Americans draw upon New York, Francophiles refer to Paris, etc. To our benefit, many of these cities even conveniently resemble each other! All displaying characteristic dense, walkable downtown areas including skyscrapers, public transit, and mixed use development. However, urban data […]

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March 10 2014

Book Review: ‘Rebel Cities’ by David Harvey

March 10th, 2014Posted by 

David Harvey is unabashedly political in his book Rebel Cities, published in 2012. He roots urban planning firmly in the realm of human rights and draws a distinct ‘line in the sand’ between cities which honor the rights of its citizens and those which have been ‘bought out’ by greater powers.   “The results of […]

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February 10 2014

Why Dallas, Texas is the USA’s Worst City for Cycling

February 10th, 2014Posted by 

In 2012, Bicycling Magazine named Dallas, Texas the worst city for cycling for the second time. The lowest percentage of cyclists in the country and the lack of a single bike lane played a major role in the decision, but the title was given in great part because of the city’s failure to follow up […]

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January 27 2014

Book Review: ‘Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change’

January 27th, 2014Posted by 

Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change is an extended summary of Peter Calthorpe’s thought leadership in the areas of urban planning and its impacts on the surrounding environment. Arguing the holistic nature of planning decisions, Urbanism is full of quotable lines and beautiful graphics demonstrating how our carbon footprint continues to grow despite advances […]

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January 13 2014

The Country’s Largest Light Rail System

January 13th, 2014Posted by 

City life in many places is synonymous with using public transportation- especially rail systems. However, when it comes to measuring the stretch of light rail miles, Dallas, Texas takes the top spot. The city has the longest light rail system in the country, spanning eighty-five miles and utilizing sixty-one stations. While the expanse of the light […]

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December 16 2013

Princeton Review’s Guide to Green Colleges Spurs Sustainable Higher Education

December 16th, 2013Posted by 

The Princeton Review has added another tool in it’s arsenal for higher education applicants: a guide to environmentally-friendly schools. On the list of the ‘Guide to 322 Green Colleges,’ is a school in the Dallas-Ft. Worth (D-FW) metroplex: the University of Texas at Dallas. Created in partnership with the US Green Building Council (USGBC), the […]

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November 04 2013

Above the Freeway, Dallas’ Klyde Warren Park Celebrates One Year

November 4th, 2013Posted by 

Texas is full of clichés. From “Everything’s bigger in…” to the familiar cowboy caricature, Texas is synonymous with a culture that characteristically ostentatious and southern. Maybe more than any of the state’s other major destinations, Dallas carries the consequence of an epic television show of the same name – glamorizing the state’s many eccentricities through […]

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